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FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Filed under: Prevention

Injury Prevention Strategies: Lifting, Strengthening, Stretching

Many back injuries result from lifting heavy objects incorrectly. Check out HPRC’s tips for proper lifting, along with some other strategies for maintaining a healthy back.

If you’ve ever had a back injury, you know that the recovery process can take weeks, months, or even years—this is referred to as a chronic condition. Preventing injuries to the back can save you from going down this long road to recovery. Check out our new article on back injuries that includes tips on lifting heavy objects, strengthening the muscles of the back, and maintaining adequate flexibility in the muscles, tendons, and ligaments.

You Need Your Knees

The knee is a complex joint that is made up of many important ligaments, tendons, and muscles. The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is one you may have heard of before because it’s a common injury, but there are strategies for decreasing your chances of injuring it.

Your knees are major weight-bearing joints and require some ongoing care to keep them functioning well, regardless of your MOS or sport activities. A new HPRC article on knee injuries provides information on knee-injury prevention. We focused on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) because this injury is quite common in the military and can put a soldier on profile for six months or even more. ACL injuries typically require surgery, so it’s an injury you want to avoid, if possible. Scientists and researchers have discovered some specific information that can be useful to decrease your risk of ACL injuries.

Injury Prevention Strategies: A real sprain in the ankle

Chances are you have either sprained an ankle at some point in your life, or you know someone who has done so. Fortunately there are strategies to keep these joints functioning well—and to keep you from having to go through the injury rehabilitation process.

Ankle injuries are quite common in the military, and you put yourself at a greater risk for sprains and strains if your ankles are weak. There are some simple tips you can use to keep your ankles healthy, including choosing the proper footwear and maintaining adequate strength in the muscles that control movement of your ankles. Check our new information on ankle injuries.

Injury Prevention Strategies: A lot rests on your shoulders

The shoulders are highly movable joints that are vulnerable to injuries. There are some steps you can take to keep them injury-free.

Many military jobs require that you have strong and healthy shoulders. So whether it’s performing well on your push-up test during the PRT or moving the ammunition can during the CFT, you need your shoulders to function well. HPRC has rolled out a new Injury Prevention Strategies series, which includes tips on preventing shoulder injuries. Check out the information on strengthening and flexibility exercises and get started today!

Too loud for you to hear?

There are some tips you can use to prevent exposure to hazardous noise levels recreationally and occupationally.

A staggering number of Americans (approximately 36 million) have hearing loss, and one-third of those probably could have been prevented. Hearing loss continues to be a safety hazard for Warfighters at home and in the field. So how do we combat this not-so-silent epidemic?  Here are a few tips to help you protect your hearing.

  • Wear a hearing protective device (HPD). HPDs should be worn for noise levels at or above 85dB. Not sure what 85dB really means? Check out this guide to occupational noise levels.  Also check out “How Loud is Too Loud?,” a graphic designed to inform Warfighters about how and when to choose the proper HPD for their jobs.
  • Learn how to wear your HPD correctly. Even if you have the correct protection, it may not be effective if you’re not wearing it correctly.
  • Always have disposable HPDs handy. Disposable HPDs are lightweight and easily portable. Make them a part of your everyday gear.

For more information about how to protect yourself against or to seek help for hearing loss check out the DoD Hearing Center of Excellence website or make an appointment with your local hearing loss treatment center.

Stay injury free with our new strategies!

Filed under: Injuries, Prevention
HPRC continues to expand its valuable strategies for injury prevention.

HPRC previously ran an Injury Prevention series with some general information to help keep you off profile. A new addition to the series is Injury Prevention Strategies, which will include information for the knees (specifically the anterior cruciate ligament or ACL), ankles, shoulders, and back. Check back often for the next in the series, and keep your body functioning at the top of its game!

Keep fit to reduce your risk of breast cancer

Exercise is beneficial for women in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. A new study finds that it’s never too late to start exercising to reduce your risk.

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness month and Military Health’s Women’s Health Awareness Month. The international pink ribbon symbol represents a community dedicated to awareness and prevention of breast cancer, a disease that mostly affects women. According the National Cancer Institute, there were over 220,000 new diagnoses of breast cancer in 2012 and more than 39,000 related deaths in the U.S. This puts breast cancer as the nation’s second leading cause of death among women (after heart disease).

What can you do to reduce your risk? A new study of more than 3,000 women found that those who exercised 10-19 hours a week during their reproductive years lowered their risk of getting breast cancer after menopause by one third. Women who started exercising after the onset of menopause also lowered their risk by about 30% with 9-17 hours of exercise per week. Researchers concluded that women can reduce their risk for breast cancer through a physically active lifestyle. The link between exercise and breast cancer is not fully understood, and research continues, but if ever you needed a good reason to start exercising or keep exercising, this is a good one. You can learn more about breast cancer and other women’s issues on the Women’s Health page of health.mil.

In conjunction with the DoD campaign, Operation Live Well, HPRC will be highlighting important issues related to both military and family health.

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