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Alerts

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Filed under: Risks

When it comes to performance—you booze, you lose

Going out for a drink to celebrate after a long race or a tough workout may be good for the soul, but it’s bad for performance.

Before you reach for a cold one, consider that drinking alcohol before, during, or after exercise can be detrimental to your performance, especially when consumed in excess. The effect of alcohol on skeletal muscles has been found to decrease strength output and can cause muscle cramps, pain, and loss of proprioception. Alcohol can also negatively affect your metabolism during exercise and contribute to dehydration. There is a shortage of data on the effects of alcohol on a recovering athlete, but some studies have shown that alcohol slows the recovery process by impacting muscle growth and repair systems. While current research has shown that alcohol in moderation can have other health benefits, it may be better to save that drink for when your physical performance is not on the line. There is also a growing body of research investigating the effects of combining alcohol with energy drinks. Many energy drinks contain substances and supplements that can interfere with normal alcohol metabolism and impair judgment. Be a conscious consumer and know what kinds of ingredients may be risky for your health.

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) has now been launched to answer many of your questions about Dietary Supplements. Visit the OPSS section of HPRC’s website now to learn more!

Keep fit to reduce your risk of breast cancer

Exercise is beneficial for women in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. A new study finds that it’s never too late to start exercising to reduce your risk.

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness month and Military Health’s Women’s Health Awareness Month. The international pink ribbon symbol represents a community dedicated to awareness and prevention of breast cancer, a disease that mostly affects women. According the National Cancer Institute, there were over 220,000 new diagnoses of breast cancer in 2012 and more than 39,000 related deaths in the U.S. This puts breast cancer as the nation’s second leading cause of death among women (after heart disease).

What can you do to reduce your risk? A new study of more than 3,000 women found that those who exercised 10-19 hours a week during their reproductive years lowered their risk of getting breast cancer after menopause by one third. Women who started exercising after the onset of menopause also lowered their risk by about 30% with 9-17 hours of exercise per week. Researchers concluded that women can reduce their risk for breast cancer through a physically active lifestyle. The link between exercise and breast cancer is not fully understood, and research continues, but if ever you needed a good reason to start exercising or keep exercising, this is a good one. You can learn more about breast cancer and other women’s issues on the Women’s Health page of health.mil.

In conjunction with the DoD campaign, Operation Live Well, HPRC will be highlighting important issues related to both military and family health.

DMAA list update for October 2012

HPRC’s latest review of DMAA-containing products shows that 89 have been discontinued or reformulated since the list was first compiled nine months ago.

HPRC’s list of DMAA-containing dietary supplement products has been reformatted, revealing that many are no longer being manufactured or distributed. A number of manufacturers now indicate on their websites that products previously containing DMAA have been reformulated. DMAA-containing versions of discontinued or reformulated products are likely to be on the market until retail supplies have been exhausted, so check labels carefully for ingredients. However, the only way to be certain a product no longer contains DMAA is through laboratory testing.

Lack of exercise is just as bad as smoking

It’s no news that smoking is bad for your health, even deadly. But a new study found that lack of exercise can be just as fatal.

A new study published in the Lancet reports that one in 10 premature deaths worldwide is related to lack of exercise, equal to 5.3 million deaths in 2008. It seems as though inactivity has become as deadly as tobacco. More specifically, researchers estimated that lack of exercise causes about 6% of heart disease, 7% of Type 2 diabetes, and 10% of colon and breast cancers worldwide. To put this in perspective, the failure to spend 15-30 minutes a day doing activities such as brisk walking could shorten your life span by three to five years. Lack of physical activity is certainly a global epidemic, but it is also highly preventable. Check out HPRC's resources on how to get you and your family physically active.

Consumer Reports on 10 hazards of dietary supplements

The Consumer Reports website recently posted an article outlining the potential dangers of dietary supplement products.

People take dietary supplements for lots of different reasons, and some may take them because they believe they are “natural” and therefore safe. A new article from ConsumerReports.org lists 10 hazards of taking dietary supplement products, pointing out that supplements are not risk-free.

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) is about to launch this summer and will answer many of your questions about Dietary Supplements. Watch for HPRC’s announcement coming soon.

FDA reports dietary supplement manufacturing violations

About half of those dietary supplement manufacturers inspected by FDA found to have manufacturing violations.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has found violations in manufacturing practices in half of almost 450 dietary supplement companies it has inspected over the last four years, according to a Chicago Tribune article. The implications of these findings can have serious health problems for consumers. Since dietary supplement manufacturers are the ones responsible for ensuring a product is safe before it is marketed, the FDA inspects companies to check for compliance and takes action only if a product is deemed unsafe after it has been marketed. For more information, see the FDA website’s Dietary Supplements section.

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) will launch this summer, with answers to many of the questions you may have about Dietary Supplements. Watch for HPRC’s announcement coming soon.

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HPRC’s DMAA list updated again

HPRC’s list of DMAA-containing dietary supplement products has just been updated, including more products found to contain DMAA and many more that are no longer being produced.

The latest update of HPRC’s list of DMAA-containing dietary supplement products is now available online. The list now indicates more than 80 products that have been removed from the market or reformulated to exclude DMAA, or that no longer include DMAA in the list of ingredients on the label and/or manufacturer’s website. In addition, DMAA-containing versions of recently removed/reformulated products are likely to still be on the market until retail stocks have been depleted, so be sure to read labels carefully. However, the only way to determine if DMAA is no longer in a product is through laboratory testing.

HPRC has begun to hear from manufacturers and distributors about changes to their products to exclude DMAA. Please note that products now seem to change almost daily, while the list is updated about every six weeks. We welcome input to help us keep track of changes.

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Alert: Dendrobium for performance?

A new dietary ingredient—a stimulant—has emerged in dietary supplement products marketed to boost athletic performance.

A new dietary supplement ingredient, dendrobium, is appearing rapidly in dietary supplement products promoted to boost athletic performance. According to the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database, manufacturers claim that dendrobium is a natural source of the stimulant phenylethylamine, but some researchers say that phenylethylamine doesn’t occur naturally in dendrobium. Phenylethylamine is a stimulant, with effects similar to those of amphetamines. At this time, the safety of dendrobium is unknown, so users should be aware that products containing this ingredient might be unsafe, particularly when used in combination with exercise.

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) is about to launch this summer and will answer many of your questions about Dietary Supplements. Watch for HPRC’s announcement coming soon.

 

Tainted products widget

Alerts and health information about tainted products marketed as dietary supplements are now automatically displayed on HPRC’s Dietary Supplement page via FDA’s “widget.”

Up-to-date information on tainted products marketed as dietary supplements are now provided on HPRC’s Dietary Supplement domain page via a “widget” from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Recent product alerts and health information on products marketed for weight loss, sexual enhancement, and bodybuilding are automatically displayed and updated as the FDA adds new notifications. Please see this new feature by visiting HPRC’s Dietary Supplements section.

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Updated DMAA list available

 HPRC’s list of DMAA-containing dietary supplement products has just been updated.

The latest update of HPRC’s list of DMAA-containing dietary supplement products is now available online. Six more products have apparently been removed from the market; one has been added to the list because the fact that it contains DMAA is stated only on the product label, not on the manufacturer’s website.

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