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USADA Athletic Advisory: Methylhexaneamine and dietary supplements

HPRC Fitness Arena: Dietary Supplements, Nutrition
Athletes are advised to avoid consuming supplements that contain the prohibited stimulant methylhexaneamine, also known as DMAA.

The United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) has issued an Athlete Advisory regarding methylhexaneamine, a prohibited stimulant. After reports that many athletes have tested positive for this stimulant, USADA is advising athletes to be cautious about taking supplements with methylhexaneamine, also referred to on labels as 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA), dimethylpentylamine (DMP 4-methylhexan-2-amine), Geranamine, and geranium oil, extract, or stems and leaves. For more information, read the USADA Athletic Advisory.

Herbal products: Important information to know

HPRC Fitness Arena: Dietary Supplements
Herbal products are advertised as “natural," but are they safe? The American Academy of Family Physicians has some answers to important questions.

There are many herbal products available to consumers, yet it is difficult to determine if they are safe. The American Academy of Family Physicians provides answers to questions about herbal product use, potential dangers with specific health problems, and possible drug interactions. A helpful chart about interactions between herbal products and supplements is also available.

The lure of Jack3d

HPRC Fitness Arena: Dietary Supplements
This relatively recent supplement targeting the exercise performance market has been growing in popularity, but the limited information about its “recipe” and the severe warnings on its label and website should make potential users think twice.

Jack3d (sometimes known as “Jacked”) is, according to the bottle, a “powerful pre-workout supplement that increases your capacity to perform.” HPRC did an extensive search for evidence-based information on Jack3d and found that all the apparently scientific literature on the product led to its promotional website, where they offer their own reviews. Anyone taking supplements should know that there have been reports about “tainted” dietary supplements containing active ingredients of FDA-approved drugs or other compounds that are not classified as dietary supplements. But there are still testimonials, blog entries, and bodybuilding forums touting the effects of Jack3d. It’s important to know exactly what is in Jack3d and that there isn’t any information on how much of each individual ingredient is in a serving.

The label of Jack3d says that it contains 4145 mg of a “Proprietary Blend” in one scoop, with 45 servings per container. In that blend are the ingredients:

  • arginine alpha-ketoglutarate,
  • creatine monohydrate,
  • beta alanine,
  • caffeine,
  • 1,3-dimethylamylamine (geranium [stem]), and
  • schizandrol A,
  • as well as some flavoring and color additives.

So, what does this all mean to a consumer? There have been individual studies conducted on each of the ingredients in Jack3d. Some are more effective than others for potentially enhancing athletic performance and building muscle mass. For example, creatine may increase muscle mass and enhance exercise performance during short, high-intensity repeated exercise bouts. For more information about creatine, see HPRC’s research brief. We know that 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA), a chemical from the geranium plant and also synthetically made, is used in supplements promoted for weight loss, bodybuilding, and enhanced athletic performance. According to the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database, it’s thought to have stimulant effects. Its chemical structure is similar to that of amphetamine, and it is on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s banned substance list. No scientific literature exists on the effectiveness of DMAA for weight loss, bodybuilding, or enhanced athletic performance. Caution is advised on the use of DMAA with caffeine, since both have stimulant effects and could increase the chance of increased heart rate and blood pressure.

The amount of caffeine per scoop of Jack3d has not been released, although it has been estimated that there is less than 150 mg of caffeine/scoop. Caffeine is included on the FDA’s list as a substance “generally recognized as safe.” However, the FDA has established a maximum concentration for caffeine in cola beverages: 32.4 mg per 6 oz or 71 mg per 12 oz. Other than colas, the caffeine content of food and beverages is not regulated. The label of Jack3d states: “Do not use in combination with caffeine or any stimulants from other sources whatsoever, including but not limited to, coffee, tea, soda and other dietary supplements or medications.” Caffeine seems to increase physical endurance, but it does not seem to affect activities that require high exertion over a short period of time, such as lifting.

The main issue with Jack3d is the same one that exists with many bodybuilding products on the market. There is no way to judge the interaction between the ingredients, especially when the consumer is unable to determine how much of each ingredient is in the product. This product contains multiple ingredients and, potentially, additional and potent ingredients not listed. It also could be contaminated, as has been seen with many other supplements. The FDA has put together information on tainted products promoted for bodybuilding.

It is important to mention that Jack3d comes with serious warnings on its label. As with any supplement, be educated, be advised, and consider all the unknowns before you decide whether the possible benefits are worth risking your health.

Herbs at a glance

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Visit the website of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine for information on many of the herbs used as and in dietary supplements.

The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) has produced a series of fact sheets on specific herbs and botanicals. Find information on common names, uses, potential side effects, and other information by choosing any of the 45 herbs or botanical fact sheets.

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FDA Press Release: Don’t use products marketed as antimicrobial dietary supplements

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The FDA is warning consumers not to buy or use products claiming to antimicrobial and marketed as dietary supplements.

 

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning consumers to stop using dietary supplement products that claim to be antimicrobial (antibiotic, antifungal, or antiviral) drugs. These products are falsely promoted to treat upper respiratory infections, sinusitis, pneumonia, bronchitis, and colds, and they look like antimicrobial products sold in Mexico.  More information, including product names, is provided in the FDA Press Release.

The FTC and fake acai “news” claims

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Watch out for apparent news websites, even those displaying recognizable logos, that make weight-loss claims for acai berry supplements. The FTC is targeting these deceptive practices.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is seeking to bar deceptive claims made by websites posing as reputable news sites to entice consumers to buy acai berry weight-loss products. The FTC says these companies are not “news-gathering organizations” and their claims that acai berry supplements can cause rapid weight loss are unsupported. For more information, read the FTC release: “FTC Seeks to Halt 10 Operators of Fake News Sites from Making Claims About Acai Berry Weight Loss Products.”

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Get 7-8 hours of sleep to perform daily tasks efficiently

HPRC Fitness Arena:
More than one-third of adults in the U.S. Don't get enough sleep, and getting less than 7 hours will impact even your everyday tasks.

According to a recent article in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, the National Sleep Foundation reported that more than one-third of adults in the United States are not sleeping enough, and inadequate sleep impairs daily tasks. Compared to those who reported sleeping 7-8 hours regularly, those who slept less than 7 hours reported significantly more trouble performing the daily tasks such as:

  • Ability to concentrate
  • Memory
  • Working on a hobby
  • Driving or taking public transport
  • Taking care of financial matters
  • Performing at work.
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Dietary supplements: Questions and answers

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) answers consumers' questions about dietary supplements and the regulations of dietary supplements.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has information for consumers regarding dietary supplements: Questions and answers, regulations, and safety alerts. Click here for their website.

Family Matters: Military Youth Risk-Taking Behavior

HPRC Fitness Arena:
In a study of military youth, risk-taking behavior was compared to national and state averages. How did they rank?

In a study of military youth, risk-taking behavior was compared to national and state averages. The researchers found that risk-taking behaviors among military youth—specifically, sexual activity and substance abuse—were much lower than national and state averages. However, there were still reports of risk-taking behaviors among military youth, so the authors caution not to misinterpret this information—even military children still need guidance. For more information on risk-taking behaviors, visit the HPRC's Mind Tactics "Performance Degraders" section.

Supplements may boost energy but strain troops' hearts

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Military doctors are worried that certain energy supplements could lead to heart problems in U.S. troops.

According to a recent  article in Stars and Stripes, Military doctors are worried that certain energy supplements could lead to heart problems in U.S. troops, particularly those serving in combat zones.

Click below to access the article.

Supplements may boost energy but strain troops' hearts

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