You are here: Home / HPRC Blog

Filed under: Supplements

Decoding the dietary supplement industry

Not all supplements are created equal. Check out this new video from OPSS to learn more about the supplement industry and choosing supplements wisely.

Dietary supplements aren’t approved or evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration before they are sold on the market. That means there is no way to know whether a product contains the exact ingredients listed on the label or any undisclosed ingredients unless it’s tested in a laboratory. In fact, some supplements have been found to contain dangerous ingredients and even ingredients not allowable in dietary supplements. So how do you know which supplements are safe to take? Watch this new video from Operation Supplement Safety about Decoding the Dietary Supplement Industry.

Kratom concerns

Kratom use is on the rise, but is it safe?

Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa korth) is marketed and regulated as a dietary supplement in the United States, yet this psychostimulant has numerous side effects. It’s a tropical tree in Malaysia and has been used as an herbal drug for years. However, in the United States, the Food and Drug Administration says it is not approved for use in dietary supplements.

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) has an FAQ on kratom, which includes pertinent information from the Drug Enforcement Administration. Also visit other OPSS FAQs on various dietary supplement ingredients.

Don’t let supplements send you to the ER

HPRC Fitness Arena: Dietary Supplements
Filed under: Drugs, OPSS, Supplements
Some supplements can have serious adverse effects and lead you to seek medical help. But there are things you can do to stay safe and out of the emergency room.

It is estimated that more than 20,000 Americans go to an emergency room every year for reasons related to dietary supplements such as allergic reactions and adverse events, according to a government study. Adverse events can result from ingredients in dietary supplements themselves or from drug-supplement interactions and can have serious side effects. Among adults, common complaints include chest pain and increased heart rate and are often associated with weight-loss products, energy products, bodybuilding products, and sexual-enhancement products.

Before taking any dietary supplement, talk to your doctor and be an informed consumer. It can prevent a health scare and even could save your life! For more information, please visit Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS), including the OPSS High-Risk Supplement List. And for more information about this study, read this article from MedlinePlus.

Understanding drug-supplement interactions

Do you take dietary supplements and medications? Read about the risks in a new resource from the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health.

Many people take dietary supplements and medications together as a part of their daily health regimen, but few are aware of the potential for harmful interactions between prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs, and dietary supplements. To help you learn more about these types of interactions, the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) created an interactive web resource that includes information about how supplements can change the effectiveness of your medications and how to work with your healthcare provide to make sure you’re taking them together safely. And for more information, please read HPRC’s Supplements and medications­ – What’s the problem?

Can SARMs do you harm?

SARMs can be found in some dietary supplement products, but are they legal and will they cause a positive drug test?

SARMs, or “selective androgen receptor modulators,” are experimental drugs that are illegal for use in dietary supplement products, but they still can be found in stores and on the Internet. SARMs are most often found in products advertised to have effects similar to those of anabolic steroids.

Read the Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) FAQ about SARMs to learn more, including the ingredient names used for SARMs that may appear on dietary supplement labels. And remember: FDA does not approve dietary supplements prior to marketing. For more information on FDA’s role with regard to dietary supplements, visit FDA Basics.

Cannabidiol in dietary supplements

FDA says that products with the ingredient cannabidiol can’t be marketed as dietary supplements.

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major chemical found in marijuana that may have beneficial effects on certain health conditions, but it’s still being tested as a new drug. However, FDA recently announced that products containing CBD cannot be sold as dietary supplements.

Read the Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) FAQ for more information, which also includes a link to the OPSS FAQ on hemp. While you’re there, check out our other OPSS FAQs. Still can’t find the answer you’re looking for? Use our “Ask the Expert” button located on the OPSS home page.

DMAA is still around

HPRC’s list of dietary supplement products containing DMAA has been updated again, revealing some new products even though DMAA is an illegal ingredient.

DMAA has been illegal as a dietary supplement ingredient for more than 2 years, but products containing this substance continue to be available. Many are still being produced (or produced again), and some are even new. That means it’s very important to read dietary supplement product labels carefully to make sure yours doesn’t contain this potentially dangerous ingredient. Not only could it be dangerous to your health, it could also be dangerous to your military career. DoD follows federal policy with regard to the use and possession of substances and products considered illegal.

Keep in mind, though, that pre-workout, weight loss, and other performance dietary supplements without DMAA also may not be safe for your health. In fact, FDA has already declared two DMAA “replacement” ingredients unsuitable for use in dietary supplements: DMBA and BMPEA. For more information, please visit these Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) FAQs:

And please visit the newest update of “Dietary Supplement Products Containing DMAA,” which lists DMAA-containing products past and present.

 

Energy drinks and teens don’t mix

Energy drinks have become increasingly popular among teens, but they provide no health benefit and can even be harmful.

It’s cause for concern: Approximately 30% of teens consume energy drinks on a regular basis. Energy drinks provide no nutritional benefit and can actually pose health risks to adolescents, including increased heart rate, high blood pressure, anxiety, digestive problems, sleep disturbances, dehydration, and even death. Teens who consume energy drinks are also more likely to engage in unhealthy behaviors such as drinking more sugar-sweetened beverages, smoking cigarettes, and using drugs and alcohol.

Many of the negative effects associated with energy drinks are due to the large amounts of stimulants in these beverages. Their caffeine content can range from 50 to more than 500 mg per can or bottle. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children and teens:

  • consume no more than 100 mg of caffeine per day (equal to about 2 cans of caffeine-containing soda or one 8 oz. cup of coffee) and
  • avoid energy drinks altogether.

However, the amount of caffeine teens consume from energy drinks is trending upwards, in part due to heavy marketing with celebrity athletes. Be sure to talk to your teens about the potential problems associated with energy drinks, and make sure they don’t confuse them with sports drinks.

Are supplements the “whey” to protein?

Whey protein is often referred to as the “king of proteins.” But are whey protein supplements the best option for muscle growth and recovery?

Whole foods, not dietary supplements, should be your first choice for protein. Protein supports muscle growth and repair. People often turn to protein supplements (such as whey, casein, and soy) to optimize those effects, especially after a workout. Whole food protein sources such as lean meats, fish, dairy products, legumes, nuts, and seeds are just as effective (in some cases more effective) than protein supplements. Whey protein products can be an acceptable, convenient, and efficient way to deliver protein when your needs are greater or when normal dietary sources are not available. If you are using protein supplements, be sure to choose a product that has been third-party evaluated for its quality. Read more here.

FDA warns again about powdered caffeine

FDA issued warning letters to 5 distributors of powdered pure caffeine and continues to warn consumers against using these products.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is again warning about the dangers of powdered pure caffeine. At least 2 deaths (both teenagers) were associated with it in 2014, yet it continues to be sold, primarily in bulk online. FDA recently sent warning letters to 5 distributors of pure powdered caffeine, warning about potential serious health effects. FDA notes that it’s difficult to determine the difference between a safe amount and a toxic amount but that one teaspoon is roughly equivalent to 28 cups of coffee. For more information, read FDA’s update and HPRC’s 2014 article.

RSS Feed