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Filed under: Yoga

Mind-body help for breast cancer

Filed under: Cancer, Mind-body, Yoga
It’s National Women’s Health Week! Breast cancer affects MANY women. Medical doctors can guide your recovery, but learn how complementary-health techniques can help you feel empowered.

Alternative therapies such as acupuncture, massage, and meditation could help you cope with different aspects and symptoms of breast cancer. Stress-management programs such as music therapy and mind-body techniques (for example, yoga and mindfulness meditation) could bring some relief too.

You could experience anxiety, depression, and/or stress during your recovery. Many patients and survivors also suffer from fatigue or sleep problems. Qigong (moving meditation), gentle yoga, and stress management techniques can help ease fatigue and improve sleep habits. And make sure you monitor your energy. Don’t try to take on too much.

If you’re receiving chemotherapy and experiencing nausea, other complementary-health approaches such as electroacupuncture and acupressure can help. A mind-body technique known as progressive muscle relaxation, which involves tensing and relaxing your muscles, could ease discomfort too.

HPRC offers additional resources on mind-body techniques and yoga. Adding these “weapons” to your arsenal might help you or someone you love in the battle against breast cancer. 

Lower-back pain? Try yoga

HPRC Fitness Arena: Total Force Fitness
If you have aches and pains in your lower back, yoga might help decrease your discomfort.

If your lower back hurts now and then, or if you struggle with ongoing pain in this area, consider yoga to help relieve the physical and mental discomfort. Lower-back pain is common, but the good news is that the pain usually goes away pretty quickly without specific treatment for most people. For others, though, lower-back pain is chronic. Practicing yoga and yoga stretches can be a great short-term way to reduce the length, intensity, and frequency of lower-back pain. For some people, yoga can even reduce this pain in the long term. And what we know so far suggests there aren’t likely to be serious negative effects of using yoga for lower-back pain.

Yoga typically includes three parts. First, breathing retraining to help calm and focus your body and mind. Second, yoga can increase your flexibility, coordination, and strength. Lastly, meditation exercises can help you develop greater self-awareness, lower your stress levels, and improve your mood.

Yoga isn’t a replacement for seeing your doctor or talking to a healthcare provider about your pain. If you have a medical condition, consult your healthcare provider before you start doing yoga. Also, everyone’s body is different, but yoga can be modified based on your body structure and how your body is feeling. There is no such thing as “perfect form.” The best practice is what you commit to doing in that moment.

Wondering how to get started? HPRC’s Mindful Stretching Exercises Using Yoga Poses will walk you through some basic yoga stretches. 

Is hot yoga too hot?

Bikram yoga, or “hot yoga,” has become a popular activity for fitness, flexibility, strength, and mindfulness. Do the benefits outweigh the risks?

Individuals who practice Bikram (hot) yoga find themselves in a 104°F room for up to 90 minutes, performing various poses and breathing exercises. This intense form of yoga claims to improve flexibility, mental focus, strength, and overall fitness. Researchers have found that Bikram yogis exhibit lower stress levels, improved endurance, muscle strength, and balance after as few as 20 yoga sessions in 8 weeks. Some older adults who participated in Bikram yoga even experienced a decrease in body-fat and improved overall glucose tolerance.

Despite these potential benefits, there are also risks with doing yoga in such an extreme environment. During a Bikram yoga session, people’s core temperature and heart rate can reach dangerous levels associated with heat illness. To reduce the risks, experts suggest sessions of 60 minutes or less, slightly lower room temperatures, and frequent water breaks. Instructors should remind their students to stay hydrated and replenish the water that they’re losing through sweat. If your instructor discourages water breaks, you should find a new instructor.

If you’re new to yoga, we recommend starting off with more traditional styles of yoga that do not involve high temperatures. Traditional styles and gentle yoga (including stretching with yoga) are also beneficial and safer for adults who may be less heat tolerant and/or are beginners.

Many people find Bikram yoga to be challenging and enjoyable, but it’s important to be smart about this kind of workout. 

Learn how to stretch mindfully

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Tactics, Total Force Fitness
Learn how to do stretches in a mindful way using yoga poses to get the benefits of both stretching and mindfulness.

Mindfulness isn’t something you have to do sitting still. You can apply mindfulness to activities such as stretching. A great way to do this is by using yoga poses. When stretching in a mindful way, you bring your attention to your breath as you stretch your muscles.

Mindful stretching can help you in a number of ways:

  • To focus your attention before or after a workout
  • To focus on and relax knotted areas within your muscles
  • To provide closure to something you’re working on (such as the transition from work to weekend)
  • As a routine before you go to bed to prime your body for sleep

In mindful stretching, the focus is not on doing repetitions or certain times, but rather going with what your body needs in the moment. To learn how, see HPRC’s “Mindful Stretching Exercises Using Yoga Poses” for a step-by-step guide with pictures. 

Reduce work-related aches and pains

Filed under: Exercise, Stress, Yoga
Not only can yoga reduce stress, it can also help to reduce the risk of those annoying aches and pains.

Many jobs involve duties that can cause minor musculoskeletal tension that builds over time until you find yourself experiencing pain. Sitting or standing for long periods of time, lifting or carrying heavy objects, and other common mission-related actions of active-duty personnel wear on the body, leading to increased risk for injury. Yoga can help to reduce this risk by improving posture, increasing energy, and stretching overused or tense muscles. If you don’t have time for yoga between work, your normal exercise routine, or family obligations, suggest sharing a quick yoga session with buddies in your unit during a break to reduce your risk for injury and help get through the afternoon. There are different styles of yoga for all skill levels.

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