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Keep your eyes on the road

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Tactics, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Driving, Safety
Distracted driving is dangerous. Check out this resource dedicated to minimizing distractions and increasing your focus on the road.

Have you found yourself checking your phone while driving? Is it more than just occasionally? Driving while distracted is simply unsafe. According to the official U.S. government website (see link below), distracted driving “is any activity that could divert a person’s attention away from the primary task of driving”—such as texting, using a cell phone, checking your hair or makeup, shaving, brushing your teeth, or just talking to your passengers. The “most alarming distraction,” according to their site, is texting, and they give an example of how it makes you blind to the road for the entire length of a football field. According to the Department of Defense Instruction 6055.04 (April 20, 2009; Incorporating Change 2, January 23, 2013), all drivers should refrain from text messaging, using cell phones, or using other hand-held electronic devices unless the vehicle is safely parked or the person is using a hands-free device. This regulation is for everyone’s safety, so put your phone away. Keep your eyes on the road and don’t drive distracted. For more information, including frequently asked questions, check out distraction.gov.

What’s the story with OxyELITE Pro?

Why has OxyELITE Pro been recalled? Read the OPSS FAQ to find out.

Two versions of OxyELITE Pro have been removed from the market in the past year. Read the Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) FAQ to find out why, and to get more information from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Also, be sure to check back often, as we add answers to other questions about ingredients in performance-enhancing and weight-loss supplements and how to choose supplements safely.

If you have more questions about a particular dietary supplement ingredient or product, please use our “Ask the Expert” button located on the OPSS home page.

DMAA products dwindle

HPRC has again revised its list of DMAA-containing products, and most U.S. manufacturers and supplier have either eliminated such products or reformulated them to eliminate DMAA.

In April, FDA announced that the substance was illegal for use as an ingredient in dietary supplements, after which the number of products that contained it rapidly declined.

Only 19 products were added to the list over the past 12 months; none were actually new to the market, but just ones that came to our attention as other products with DMAA became unavailable. By comparison, 46 products were discontinued/reformulated, and 86 DMAA-containing products (or versions of products) appear to have disappeared completely from online retail availability. Only 61 products remain on the “active” list, and many of these are from non-U.S. sources; some still on the list may have eliminated (or are about to eliminate) DMAA, but their manufacturer/distributor websites are unclear as to their status.

HPRC will continue to update its list and report of “Dietary Supplement Products Containing DMAA,” with the most recent version dated 12 December 2013, but updates will appear less often than in the last two years.

Food safety tips for the holidays

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Here are some helpful food safety tips for holiday cooking.

No one wants to experience foodborne illness. However, there are safety tips and techniques that will help prevent such incidents. The Food and Drug Administration has developed Food Safety Tips for Healthy Holidays, which includes other helpful links about food safety.

New year, new coveralls for the Navy

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Navy, Safety, Uniforms
By early 2014, more sailors will be better protected against fires with new flame-resistant coveralls.

Before 2013 comes to a close, the Navy will begin distributing Flame Resistant Variant (FRV) coveralls to all Sailors assigned to surface ships and aircraft carriers. Previously, only Sailors working in engineering departments, on flight decks, and in other high-risk areas were issued flame-resistant clothing. However, a recent review found that the highest risk of severe injury from flames was from major fires or explosions, which puts any Sailor at risk. Tests revealed that the Navy Working Uniforms (NWU) type I, made of a polyester cotton blend, are susceptible to melting in a fire, which could cause even greater injury to the wearer. The new FRV coveralls are 100% cotton with a fire-resistant coating, which is self-extinguishing. The Navy plans to improve and standardize all coveralls over the next couple years by combining the protective effects of flame resistance, arc-flash protection, and low-lint specifications into one safe and effective uniform.

Happy Halloween!

Happy Halloween from HPRC! Review some safety tips for a great holiday this year.

HPRC wishes you a very Happy Halloween! Halloween can be a fun family holiday, with costumes, trick-or-treating, parties, and food. But before you jump all in, review some safety tips to keep this holiday fun and safe! The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention highlights some tips: Don’t trick or treat alone or stop at dark houses and do wear reflective tape, examine all candy for evidence of tampering, avoid homemade treats, and use a flashlight. Visit the CDC website to read the full article.

Social media “red flags”

You shouldn’t believe everything you read on social media, especially when it comes to dietary supplements and sports products.

Sports products and dietary supplements are often discussed on social media, but think twice before taking other’s word for it. A recent article in the British Medical Journal notes that claims and endorsements made on social media such as Facebook & Twitter are not regulated and may promote statements that have not been supported by science. Some red flags noted include:

  • Paid endorsers. Do you know that some comments and images about a product can come from people (celebrities and non-celebrities) paid by companies to post great reviews about their products? Be careful that such claims may be coming from a paid sponsor and may exaggerate their results from a product.
  • Endorsed hashtags. The hashtag such as “#ad” is a disclosure recommended by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to indicate that a social media post is coming from someone being paid (or otherwise reimbursed) by the company of the product they are endorsing. If such a hashtag appears in a social media post, then you know that it is sponsored and may be biased. (For more about FTC’s new endorsement guidelines, visit their FAQs web page.)
  • Biased research. Assessing the science behind claims is the best way to evaluate a product. However, a common practice is that companies cite their own labs and research. When it comes to dietary supplements, it’s best to get information about products from unbiased, evidence-based organizations such as Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database, United States Pharmacopeias (USP), or NSF International.
  • Unbalanced comments. When you scroll through a product’s social media page, do you find that all the reviews are positive? On platforms such as Facebook, companies have the ability to delete comments. A transparent company usually addresses negative comments and provides support to establish its position.

Look for these and other red flags when it comes to dietary supplements and their advertising. If you have a question about a particular sports product or dietary supplement and can’t find the answer on HPRC’s website, please use our “Ask The Expert” button located on the Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) home page.

Injury prevention Part 6 – Hands and wrists

Even if you haven’t experienced carpal tunnel syndrome, you’ve probably heard of it. For more about this condition and ways to keep your hands and wrists pain-free, read on.

If you’ve been experiencing pain, burning, numbness, or tingling in one or both of your hands, you might be experiencing symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. This “tunnel” in the wrist carries the important tendons and nerves that supply your hands with motor and sensory functions, allowing your hands to move and feel. Swelling inside the carpal tunnel can squeeze the median nerve that passes through it, causing discomfort. According to the Defense Medical Epidemiology Database, in the military, women are more likely than men to develop this condition. It’s also more likely to develop with age and rank. There are surgical and non-surgical treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome, but as the saying goes, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” The University of Maryland Medical Center has advice, which includes:

  1. Do exercises to keep your muscles and tendon flexible. (See the UMMC link above for detailed instructions.)
  2. When performing repetitive activities your the wrists and hands, take frequent breaks, even if it’s just for a minute or two at a time—called “microbreaks.”
  3. Use correct posture and technique, especially wrist position when using a keyboard or hand tools.
  4. Make sure that your work area is ergonomically sound. Military-specific information is available from both the Army Public Health Command and the Naval Safety Center.

HPRC’s Physical Fitness domain also has a section on Injury Prevention.

Injury Prevention Part 4 – The Back

Back pain is common among military personnel. Follow these tips to maintain a healthy back and stay at the top of your game.

A 2011 study of musculoskeletal injuries in an Infantry Brigade Combat Team deployed to Afghanistan found that low back pain due to stress and strain on the back (not actual spinal cord injuries) was the most common complaint. Common causes of back injury include overuse, poor physical conditioning, and incorrect body movements when lifting and moving objects. Fortunately you can decrease your chances of injuring the muscles and ligaments of your back. The key is prevention: Stretching is one way to help prevent lower back pain, but it’s essential to use correct posture and body mechanics when you pick up and move objects such as heavy ammo cans! Daily back exercises (from the Mayo Clinic) and stretches can help strengthen your core and improve your posture, and the University of Maryland offers more valuable tips for prevention. If you’re experiencing back pain, however, you need to see a qualified healthcare professional for an accurate diagnosis and exercise program.

Injury Prevention Part 3 – The Rotator Cuff

Injuries to the shoulder are common among military personnel—take steps to keep yours injury-free.

Staying in the physical condition you need for demanding duties and missions means that you are at risk for specific types of injuries, and rotator cuff injuries are common among service members. The rotator cuff is actually a group of muscles key to shoulder movement, including the ability to perform overhead activities. For those who are preparing for the CFT, this includes performing the Ammo Lift.

Warning signs of a shoulder injury can include not only pain and abnormal sounds during shoulder movement but also a decrease in strength and mobility/motion. What can you do about it? First, check with your healthcare provider to make sure that your injury does not require medical treatment. Then:

  1. Rest your injured shoulder! It is important to allow adequate time for healing.
  2. Use the RICE and ISE methods.
  3. Strengthen the muscles that control shoulder movement.
  4. Make sure that you have adequate flexibility of the rotator cuff muscles.

Of course, it’s always better to prevent injuries in the first place. To help reduce your risk of rotator cuff injury, it’s important to develop the strength and flexibility of the related muscles. For specific information on rotator-cuff exercises and self-care, check out these suggestions from MedLine Plus (a service of the National Institutes of Health) and this conditioning program from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

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