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FDA Press Release: Don’t use products marketed as antimicrobial dietary supplements

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The FDA is warning consumers not to buy or use products claiming to antimicrobial and marketed as dietary supplements.

 

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning consumers to stop using dietary supplement products that claim to be antimicrobial (antibiotic, antifungal, or antiviral) drugs. These products are falsely promoted to treat upper respiratory infections, sinusitis, pneumonia, bronchitis, and colds, and they look like antimicrobial products sold in Mexico.  More information, including product names, is provided in the FDA Press Release.

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FDA Press Release: FDA Warns about Counterfeit ExtenZe Dietary Supplements

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The FDA is warning consumers about a counterfeit product marketed as the dietary supplement product “ExtenZe”

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a press release to consumers warning them about a counterfeit product being represented as the dietary supplement "ExtenZe.” The counterfeit product has hidden ingredients, including tadalafil or a combination of tadalafil and sildenafil, which are active ingredients of FDA-approved drugs, making these products unapproved drugs. Taking these products with prescription medications containing nitrates could lower blood pressure to dangerous levels. More information, including the lot numbers on the counterfeit packages, is provided in the FDA Press Release.

Help or hindrance? Market for melatonin-laced brownie snacks persists

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Lazy Cakes, Kush Cakes and Lulla Pies are the names of melatonin-laced snacks that have been in the news lately as an anti-dote to the trend of energy/caffeinated powered beverages and products. But the research on whether they are safe, or that they actually work, has not been established.

Lazy Cakes, Kush Cakes, and Lulla Pies are the names of melatonin-laced snacks that have been in the news lately as an antidote to the trend of energy/caffeinated powered beverages and products. But there is no research available on whether they are safe, or whether they actually work.

The New York Times reported on the sale of these products and others that are being sold online and in convenience stores and smoke shops. Some claim melatonin has a relaxing effect and can be used to alleviate jet lag or simply help induce sleep. But the Food and Drug Administration hasn't approved melatonin as a food additive or confirmed its safety when used as a sleep aid.

The HPRC began encountering stories of melatonin-laced brownie products back in March 2011, and we posted a Healthy Tip then that focused on the emergence of Lazy Cakes.

The FTC and fake acai “news” claims

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Watch out for apparent news websites, even those displaying recognizable logos, that make weight-loss claims for acai berry supplements. The FTC is targeting these deceptive practices.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is seeking to bar deceptive claims made by websites posing as reputable news sites to entice consumers to buy acai berry weight-loss products. The FTC says these companies are not “news-gathering organizations” and their claims that acai berry supplements can cause rapid weight loss are unsupported. For more information, read the FTC release: “FTC Seeks to Halt 10 Operators of Fake News Sites from Making Claims About Acai Berry Weight Loss Products.”

FDA Press Release: FDA and FTC issue warning letter to companies selling fraudulent STD products

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The FDA and FTC have issued a warning to companies marketing unproven products to treat STDs.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued warning letters to several companies selling unproven products claiming to treat, cure, and prevent sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). These products—such as Medavir, Herpaflor, Viruxo, C-Cure, and Never an Outbreak—violate federal law because the FDA has not evaluated them for safety and effectiveness. Some are marketed as dietary supplements, but the FDA considers them drugs since they are offered for the treatment of disease. More information is provided in the FDA Press Release.

What is vitamin B12?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Make sure you get enough vitamin B12 every day. It’s an essential nutrient that must be obtained from food; your body can’t make it.

Vitamin B12 is one of the eight B vitamins and is water-soluble. Our bodies do not store vitamin B12 so we must consume it daily. It is an important nutrient that helps make DNA, the genetic material in cells, and is essential for normal functioning of the brain and nervous system. Good food choices for vitamin B12 are beef liver, clams, fish, meat, poultry, eggs, and other dairy products. Read the Office of Dietary Supplement’s Vitamin B12 Fact Sheet for additional information.

What are hidden sources of caffeine?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The labels on products often don’t mention caffeine content, so you have to know what ingredients contribute caffeine where you may not expect it.

We know about colas, coffee, tea, and chocolate, but caffeine can also be found in some over-the-counter drugs and herbal dietary supplement products. Energy drinks contain caffeine, and some also contain guarana, a plant with high amounts of caffeine. Yerba mate, green tea extract, and kola nuts are also sources of caffeine, and can be found in weight-loss and performance-enhancing dietary supplements. Be sure to read labels for hidden sources of caffeine.

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Dietary supplements: Questions and answers

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) answers consumers' questions about dietary supplements and the regulations of dietary supplements.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has information for consumers regarding dietary supplements: Questions and answers, regulations, and safety alerts. Click here for their website.

FDA Alert: FDA Warns Consumers to Stop Using Soladek Vitamin Solution

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a warning about a vitamin solution, Soladek; samples that were tested contained dangerously high levels of vitamins A and D.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a warning about a vitamin solution, Soladek; samples that were tested contained dangerously high levels of vitamins A and D.  The FDA has advised consumers currently using this product to stop immediately.

For more information, read the FDA warning.

Lazy Cakes: Brownies – or something else?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
With added melatonin to help you relax, this is no typical brownie.

Lazy Cakes Relaxation Brownies claim to “have relaxation built into every bite.” One brownie (half is the recommended serving size) contains 3 mg of melatonin, a hormone made by the body but also available as a supplement that is often used to treat sleep disorders and jet lag. Selling these brownies as a dietary supplement allows the manufacturer to avoid FDA regulation for foods and beverages. The label warns consumers not to drive or operate heavy machinery and to consult your physician if you are taking medication or are pregnant or nursing; it also says the product is recommended for adults only. Buyers beware…this is no typical brownie.

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