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Alert: Dendrobium for performance?

A new dietary ingredient—a stimulant—has emerged in dietary supplement products marketed to boost athletic performance.

A new dietary supplement ingredient, dendrobium, is appearing rapidly in dietary supplement products promoted to boost athletic performance. According to the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database, manufacturers claim that dendrobium is a natural source of the stimulant phenylethylamine, but some researchers say that phenylethylamine doesn’t occur naturally in dendrobium. Phenylethylamine is a stimulant, with effects similar to those of amphetamines. At this time, the safety of dendrobium is unknown, so users should be aware that products containing this ingredient might be unsafe, particularly when used in combination with exercise.

Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) is about to launch this summer and will answer many of your questions about Dietary Supplements. Watch for HPRC’s announcement coming soon.

 

Food safety update: E. coli testing in beef

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Six additional strains of E. coli are now being testing in beef trimmings to prevent more foodborne illnesses.

The United States Department of Agriculture has begun testing six additional strains of E. coli in beef that have been responsible for severe human illness. In this effort to safeguard the U.S. food supply, the new testing will help ensure that all beef sold in the U.S. will be free of these pathogens. For additional information, including the specific strains of E. coli, please read the USDA News Release.

Tainted products widget

Alerts and health information about tainted products marketed as dietary supplements are now automatically displayed on HPRC’s Dietary Supplement page via FDA’s “widget.”

Up-to-date information on tainted products marketed as dietary supplements are now provided on HPRC’s Dietary Supplement domain page via a “widget” from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Recent product alerts and health information on products marketed for weight loss, sexual enhancement, and bodybuilding are automatically displayed and updated as the FDA adds new notifications. Please see this new feature by visiting HPRC’s Dietary Supplements section.

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Updated DMAA list available

 HPRC’s list of DMAA-containing dietary supplement products has just been updated.

The latest update of HPRC’s list of DMAA-containing dietary supplement products is now available online. Six more products have apparently been removed from the market; one has been added to the list because the fact that it contains DMAA is stated only on the product label, not on the manufacturer’s website.

Stars and Stripes reports: Army study on DMAA will continue

The Army will continue its own study on the effects of DMAA even after the FDA sent warning letters to marketers and distributors of dietary supplement products with DMAA.

Following in the wake of the Food and Drug Administration’s warning letters to manufacturers and distributors of dietary supplements containing DMAA, the Army announced that its own study on the effects of DMAA on soldiers will continue. Read about the announcement and more in the recent Stars and Stripes article. For more information about the FDA’s action, you can read HPRC’s post, which also includes a link to the FDA news release.

FDA Warns Companies about DMAA Safety

Marketers and distributors of products containing DMAA warned by FDA.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) sent warning letters to manufacturers and distributors of dietary supplements containing 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA) due to lack of safety evidence provided before marketing. The FDA states that information about the safety of DMAA as a dietary supplement ingredient has not been identified. For more information, see the FDA News Release and HPRC’s latest on Dietary Supplement Products Containing DMAA.

DMAA list updates

HPRC has again updated its list of DMAA containing products. The latest news includes New Zealand’s ban on DMAA-containing products.

The latest news on DMAA includes the New Zealand government’s ban just placed on DMAA-containing products. DMAA has already been declared a drug in Canada and is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency, the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA), collegiate sports teams, and most professional sports teams.

HPRC has again updated its list of DMAA-containing dietary supplements, including a number of additions as well as some products that have been discontinued or reformulated. The additions mostly represent lesser-known products that have been around a while, but surprisingly there are a couple new products too. And we have added two new “aliases” to the list of other names for DMAA. To download the list, click on this link to “Dietary Supplement Products Containing DMAA.

Senator Durbin urges FDA to investigate energy drinks

Senator Dick Durbin has asked the FDA to investigate the caffeine content and other ingredients in energy drinks due to serious concerns about their safety.

HPRC has written about energy drinks and their possible adverse health effects; these drinks continue to be in the news following the death of a teenage girl due to caffeine toxicity from drinking two Monster energy drinks. Senator Dick Durbin has now urged the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to investigate energy drinks, specifically to regulate caffeine in these drinks (caffeine content in colas is already regulated) and determine whether other ingredients contained in them are safe. Read the press release and Senator Durbin’s letter to FDA.

Introducing OPSS: Operation Supplement Safety

Watch for new educational materials about how to determine if a dietary supplement is relatively safe or not.

Do you buy dietary supplements when you want to lose weight, improve your performance, or give yourself a boost to get through a long day or hard workout? Then watch for this soon-to-be-released service-wide educational campaign by the Department of Defense in collaboration with the Human Performance Resource Center. Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) will help Warfighters and their families make informed decisions when choosing dietary supplements. See HPRC’s new OPSS link for an introductory article on supplement safety.

DMAA-containing products list updated

HPRC has updated its list of products containing DMAA to help you make informed decisions in buying dietary supplements.

HPRC recently posted a list of dietary supplement products containing DMAA. Since we originally posted this list at the end of December, some changes have occurred that deserve note. Some products are no longer available on the manufacturer’s websites, while others appear to have been reformulated to eliminate DMAA from their recipes. To download the updated list, go to the Dietary Supplements Resources page under the “Resources” tab, or just click on this link to directly access “Dietary Supplement Products Containing DMAA.”

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