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Alerts

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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HPRC Blog

Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

Revisiting DMAA

Products with DMAA are disappearing quickly since the April 2013 announcement by FDA that DMAA is illegal, but some are still available. Check our updated list to make sure you don't inadvertently buy them.

HPRC presents its shortest list to date of still-available Dietary Supplements/Products Containing DMAA! Since our last update in December 2013, 20 more products have been discontinued or reformulated to remove DMAA, and even more have disappeared from Internet retail sources altogether. Currently, we have found only 41 products (out of more than 200 once on the list) that still appear to be in manufacture, in many cases from non-U.S. sources.

Since its April 2013 announcement that DMAA is illegal as a dietary supplement ingredient, FDA has cracked down on manufacturers and suppliers in the U.S. As an example, an FDA News Release last November highlighted the seizure of more than $2 million in products from a single company. For more about DMAA from FDA, read their “DMAA in Dietary Supplements” web page.

Hemp products: Are they allowed?

Hemp is found in many food products, but what are the service policies on the use of these products?

There’s hemp turning up in yogurt, cereal, milk, and other food products these days. What is hemp, and what are the service policies on the use of these food products? Read the Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) FAQ to find out. Be sure to check back often as we add answers to other questions and topics in the OPSS section of HPRC’s website.

If you have a question about a particular dietary supplement ingredient or product, and you can’t find the answer on our website, please use our “Ask the Expert” button located on the OPSS home page.

Cleansing programs: Friend or foe?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Are internal cleansing programs safe and effective for the Warfighter? Learn the facts.

A hot trend in nutrition and dieting for some Warfighters is internal cleansing (or “cleansing” for short). Typical cleansing programs promise renewed energy, weight loss, and a fresh start—appealing offers following the rigors of a deployment, a recent change of duty station, or just life in general. Variants of cleansing programs may include “detox” (short for detoxification) diets, dietary supplement products, enemas, or some combination of these.

Although some detox diets emphasize eating lots of fruits and vegetables and drinking plenty of water, many detox diets lack certain vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients, and are dangerously low in calories. It might be difficult for a Warfighter to obtain adequate calories for optimal performance while following a typical detox diet.

Detox supplement products often contain herbs and other plant-based chemicals that have a laxative effect. Long-term use of laxative products can cause changes in the structure of your large intestine (colon) that might have serious health effects. Laxatives can cause dehydration, which impairs performance. In addition, according to the Food and Drug Administration there are concerns about dietary supplement products containing hidden active ingredients that can result in harmful effects.

Detox enemas, often marketed as “colon cleanse” products, cause the contents of the colon to be quickly expelled. Detox enemas contain a variety of substances, some of which can cause allergic reactions or electrolyte imbalances. Since many detox enemas are self-administered, there’s also the risk of tearing the inside of your rectum during the procedure, which can cause septicemia—a type of bacterial infection in the blood.

The guiding principle behind cleanse programs is that environmental and dietary toxins supposedly build up in your body, and you need to get rid of them to be healthy. However, there really isn’t any scientific evidence backing up these claims. Your body is designed to detox itself by getting rid of wastes through urine, feces, and sweat. The best way to take advantage of these built-in detox systems is to drink plenty of water (to produce more urine), get plenty of fiber from fruits, vegetables, and whole grains (to help pass feces), and exercise (to produce sweat)—a proven program to help you perform better and live a healthy life.

Injury Prevention Strategies: A real sprain in the ankle

Chances are you have either sprained an ankle at some point in your life, or you know someone who has done so. Fortunately there are strategies to keep these joints functioning well—and to keep you from having to go through the injury rehabilitation process.

Ankle injuries are quite common in the military, and you put yourself at a greater risk for sprains and strains if your ankles are weak. There are some simple tips you can use to keep your ankles healthy, including choosing the proper footwear and maintaining adequate strength in the muscles that control movement of your ankles. Check our new information on ankle injuries.

First steps to a financially fit force

Saving money can be difficult but with some planning, it is possible to turn $200 a month into $2400 in a year in savings.

A lot of money-saving challenges have been sprouting up all over the web. These savings challenges may seem like one-size-fits-all easy-savings plans, but can they really help Warfighters save money?

As for most for financial questions, the answer is “it depends.” For some, using one of these challenges can be a fun, easy way to set aside additional savings, but for others it could be a futile attempt ending in frustration. Problems arise when the lofty savings goals touted by such plans just don’t fit your lifestyle.

So what then? Should you give up and do nothing? No! Have a savings goal, but make sure it’s one tailored to your own financial abilities. Start with an understanding of what you can save, and be realistic about your savings goals and how they can fit into your life. If $200 a month is too much, then don’t aim to save $2400 by the end of the year.

If you decide you can save $1400 a year, that averages out to be $26.50 per week, or about the cost of two pizzas. Maybe you can save more some weeks than others. If so, then just keep track of what you’ve saved. As long as you average about $115 per month, you can reach your goal of $1400 by the end of the year. If you start to see that your goal was too ambitious, don’t be afraid to adjust it instead of being disappointed at the end of the year or, worse, giving up.

For more information, visit Military OneSource’s “How to Save” web page.

Happiness leads to success

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Tactics, Total Force Fitness
Happiness leads to success, and vice versa! Learn why.

You have probably noticed that people tend to be happy when they’re successful. But did you know that it can also work the other way—that happiness can lead to success? Happier people tend to get more excited about chasing after opportunities. Happy people tend to interpret, remember, and even experience life events differently than unhappy people. For example, happy people tend to like other people more readily (leading to positive interactions). And when they are faced with adversity, they tend to use humor and focus on what has gone well recently. Across studies, researchers have found evidence that in marriage, friendship, income, work performance, and health, there is a two-way street: Success leads to happiness and happiness leads to success! Want to experience the successes of a happy person? One strategy is to be sure to somehow experience positive emotions frequently. Check out HPRC’s series highlighting research-based tips for making this happen.

Relief for your aching back?

Epidural steroid injections can provide short-term relief for back and neck pain.

HPRC continues its series on Pain Management with an article on epidural steroid injections (ESIs), which involve injections of pain medication around the spinal nerve roots. They are done by qualified healthcare providers for short-term relief of back and neck pain. They also can help doctors diagnose some types of pain. Learn more in HPRC’s “Epidural Steroid Injections for Pain."

Injury Prevention Strategies: A lot rests on your shoulders

The shoulders are highly movable joints that are vulnerable to injuries. There are some steps you can take to keep them injury-free.

Many military jobs require that you have strong and healthy shoulders. So whether it’s performing well on your push-up test during the PRT or moving the ammunition can during the CFT, you need your shoulders to function well. HPRC has rolled out a new Injury Prevention Strategies series, which includes tips on preventing shoulder injuries. Check out the information on strengthening and flexibility exercises and get started today!

Air Force energy drinks guidance for downrange DFACs

Air Force guidance advises downrange DFACs to stop buying energy drinks, nutritional shakes and energy bars due to health concerns.

A new Air Force guidance, which will be go into effect in a few months, directs all downrange DFACS (dining facilities) to stop buying energy drinks, nutritional shakes, and energy bars. Air Force DFACs in the U.S. do not buy these products either. The new guidance is a result of health concerns from consuming energy drinks and these other products. Read the article in the Air Force Times for more information.

Go for Green®: The basics

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Get the scoop on DoD’s new food-identification program designed to help you optimize your nutrition.

Have you heard about Go for Green®?

Go for Green® is a DoD-wide, joint-service food-identification program. It’s designed to help you easily identify the nutritional value of foods when you’re standing in line at the dining facility (DFAC) deciding what to eat.

Foods in DFACs are color-coded Green, Yellow, or Red to help you choose foods for optimal performance. When using Go for Green® in the DFAC, look for these symbols to identify “Green,” “Yellow,” or “Red” foods.

What do the colors mean?

Menu Label Green [JPG]Menu Bus Card Green [JPG]

Go: High-Performance Food

Green” foods can and should be eaten everyday. These foods score high in nutrient density (the ratio of nutrients to calories in a food) and help you perform best. Most “Green” foods can be eaten without having to worry much about portion size.

Menu Label Yellow [JPG]Menu Bus Card Yellow [JPG]

Caution: Eat occasionally

Yellow” foods are still healthy in small amounts but should be eaten less often than “Green” foods. How much and how often depends on your health and performance goals. Try to eat “Yellow” foods just some of the time.

Menu Label Red [JPG]Menu Bus Card Red [JPG]

Limit: Eat rarely

Red” foods are meant to be treats eaten just once in a while. They have little nutritional quality but are often an enjoyable part of eating. Most people can have a few “Red” foods each week and still meet health and performance goals. Try to limit how much and how often you eat “Red” foods, and balance them with plenty of “Green” foods.

Although the Go for Green® program is geared toward use in the DFAC, it translates well to just about any setting—home, fast-food restaurants, even when eating MREs. Eating the Go for Green® way can promote a healthier, better-performing you. For more information, visit the Go for Green® website. Download the Go for Green® Guide for a handy reference.

Need help deciding how much to eat? Look for future posts about how to personalize Go for Green® based on your individual calorie and performance needs.

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