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HPRC Blog

Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

New Dietary Guidelines for Americans

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Diet, Nutrition, USDA
The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans were recently released. They offer the government’s best advice on healthy eating. How can they help you?

The U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Health and Human Services (HHS) just released the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. These guidelines help shape policies for school lunch and breakfast programs, Woman, Infants, and Children (WIC), and nourishment programs for the elderly and military. The skinny is that they’re based on evolving nutrition science. They offer practical guidance on how to develop a nutrition plan too. Remember you can also seek a dietitian’s help to meet your goals towards healthy eating and performing well. Read more here

Not your grandma’s wheelchair

The National Veterans Wheelchair Games (NVWG) will be held from June 27–July 2, 2016. Learn more about the games and how you can get involved.

This summer marks the 36th annual National Veterans Wheelchair Games (NVWG). The events, co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the Paralyzed Veterans of America, begin on June 27, 2016 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Registration deadline is April 15, 2016. Register early as events fill up fast. Any veteran who uses a wheelchair for sport and is eligible for care in the VA system (due to spinal cord injury, Multiple Sclerosis, amputation, or neurological condition) can participate. Need some motivation? Check out this video from last year’s games.

We’re always looking for sponsors and volunteers to help with NVWG activities—come on out and support our vets!

Chill out and keep moving!

You don’t have to hibernate during the colder months. Exercising in the cold takes a little extra planning to stay safe and comfortable.

Don’t let cold weather freeze your exercise routine. Use these tips to stay motivated, safe, and warm.

  • Dress in layers. Choose synthetic materials such as polyester or polypropylene that stay close to the skin. Avoid cotton since it soaks up sweat! You can always remove layers as you get warmer.
  • Protect your extremities—especially your fingers, toes, and ears. Circulation to these areas decreases in cold weather.
  • Check the forecast. Wind chill, snow, and rain can make your body more vulnerable to the outside temperatures. Plan an indoor workout when the wind chill is extreme or the temperature drops below 0°F.
  • Apply sunblock. You can still get sunburned in the winter so don’t forget the sunscreen!
  • Stay hydrated. When exercising in cold climates, don’t rely on thirst to indicate hydration since you usually don’t feel as thirsty in cold temperatures. You need to stay just as hydrated in cold weather as you do when it’s hot outside.
  • Ask your doctor. Certain symptoms might worsen in cold weather if you have asthma, heart issues, or Raynaud’s disease (when specific body parts feel numb due to to cold temperatures or stress). Talk to a healthcare professional about your concerns before heading outside for your cold-weather workout.

Overcome your weight-loss plateau

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Can’t seem to lose those last few pounds? Here are some tips to help you get past the plateau and back on track to achieving your goal.

Have you been watching what you eat and exercising regularly, but for some reason, the scale just won’t budge? You might be at a “plateau” in your weight-loss journey. But with continued effort and persistence, you can do it! If you want to shed those last few pounds, try these ideas on for size:

  • Track it. To keep old, unhealthy eating habits at bay, keep a food diary or record your intake through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) SuperTracker. This online program helps you see where your calories are coming from. Don’t forget to watch your portion sizes too.
  • Stick to your plan. Remember the fundamentals of a healthy eating plan: nutrient-rich, lean sources of protein such as fish, poultry, beans, nuts, and low-fat dairy products. Make sure to include whole grains, fruits, and vegetables too. It’s okay to indulge a little, but too many “cheat days” can ruin all your hard work.
  • Eat protein. Protein helps preserve lean body mass (muscle) during weight loss, promote fat loss, and contribute to a feeling of fullness. Use HPRC’s Protein Requirements infosheet to calculate your individual protein needs.
  • Rethink your drinks. Alcohol and sugar-sweetened beverages such as soda, sweet tea, juice, energy drinks, and sports drinks can add too many calories and prevent you from losing weight. Stick to water and low-fat milk (or soymilk) during meals and in-between to stay hydrated. Three servings of milk per day is the limit though!
  • Shake things up. Varying the type, intensity, duration, and frequency of your exercise is a great way to challenge yourself and prevent boredom—and it can make a big difference toward reaching your goal.

Whatever you do, don’t give up. Achieving and maintaining a healthy weight is better for your health, career, and performance.

Face fears and imagine success

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Body, Total Force Fitness
When fear of failure takes hold, explore it—and conquer it.

Fear of failure can prevent you from performing your best in many situations including combat, work, relationships, and daily life. Worry can take a bigger hold when you push it aside. For instance, while preparing to give a presentation and thinking, “I can’t be nervous,” you might actually feel more nervous!

As you face your fears, understand that fearing something will happen doesn't mean that it will happen. Ask yourself these kinds of questions:

  • Why do I think I can’t be nervous? If I’m nervous, I’ll give a horrible talk.
  • So if I’m nervous, I’m guaranteed to give a horrible talk? No, I’ve given good talks while nervous before.
  • If nervousness leads to giving an awful talk, what’s the worst thing about that? I’d be embarrassed and people would walk away without having learned important material.
  • What’s worse—embarrassment or people walking away without learning? I’d survive the embarrassment. People need to learn this stuff.
  • Is this their last opportunity to learn? No, I’d take more steps to make sure they got it, despite an initially awful talk.

Once you fully consider the failure scenarios, spend more time imagining a positive outcome and accomplishing smaller goals that lead to success.

Shifting from service family to civilian family

Transitioning from active duty to veteran status involves change. Learn how your entire family can weather these changes well.

Have you decided to separate from the military? If your estimated time of separation (ETS) date has arrived, you’ve probably checked off your long to-do list and officially become a veteran. This can be an exciting and emotional time. Regardless of your reason for separating, this is a time of transition for your entire family. Here are some tips for easing your path to civilian life. Read more here.

You’ve got questions?

We’ve got answers. Learn more about staying physically fit in HPRC’s FAQ and Ask the Expert sections.

Looking for some answers to basic fitness questions? You’re not alone. We’ve created a FAQ section on topics we hear a lot about. Whether you want to know about flexibility, cardiovascular fitness, injury prevention, or workout routines—we have the answers. Still can’t find what you’re looking for? Submit your question using our Ask the Expert feature. We’ll provide an evidence-based answer to keep you informed and in shape.

Check back often to learn the latest and greatest information on exercising, optimizing performance, and staying resilient. 

Chia seeds and drug testing

Will chia seeds cause a positive drug test? Read more and find out what you really need to avoid.

Chia (Salvia hispanica) seeds are rich in omega-3 fatty acids and fiber. As such, they have become a popular food item, and you can also find chia (seeds and oil) in many dietary supplements marketed to support heart and digestive health. On its own, chia will not produce a positive drug test. However, when you look at ingredient lists on product labels, don’t confuse Salvia hispanica (chia) with Salvia divinorum (Diviner’s sage), which is banned by some services. There are many types of salvia, so please read the OPSS FAQ about salvia for more information. If you’re interested in learning more about chia seeds, visit this webpage from MedlinePlus.

Plan your meals in minutes!

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
The workday is ending—and you’re stressed from not knowing what to prepare at mealtime. With some advance preparation using HPRC’s meal-planning strategies, you’ll look forward to what’s for dinner.

We all want to serve healthy, nourishing food to our families. But sometimes we let our best intentions get in the way. You wouldn’t head into the woods without a plan, map, or GPS—so why begin your day with little thought about eating well? Start this year off right by learning and putting these easy meal-planning practices into place. Once you’ve established these habits, you’ll be amazed at how good it feels to map out your meals. The more you practice HPRC’s strategies—the faster and fitter you’ll be—a huge savings to your body, time, and wallet. Read more here. 

 

First comes love, then comes remarriage

Remarriage is an exciting time that brings lots of changes. Learn some tips to help ease this transition.

Getting married again is a time of new beginnings. It’s often a time of challenges and changes too. While you’re celebrating your marriage and deciding what kind of stepparent you’ll be (if your partner has children), there are a few things you can do to stay happy:

  • Maintain your identity as an individual—separate from your spouse. This will help you weather challenges with confidence. But strike a balance with staying close to your spouse too.
  • Focus on each other. Sharing intimacy with your spouse includes a healthy sex life too. This helps you two connect regularly.
  • Stay flexible. Often remarriage means juggling new responsibilities, living in a new place, or becoming a stepparent. Bending with whatever life throws at you means you’re less likely to break or falter.
  • Keep a sense of humor. Laughing at yourself or the situations you find yourself in can help you keep perspective.
  • Don’t take the place of a biological parent if you’re becoming a stepparent. Foster your own relationship with your stepchild and follow your partner’s lead.
  • Remember how you felt when you fell in love. Keep those memories alive—they’ll help get you through tougher times.  
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