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Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

Stand up and get moving!

Filed under: Exercise, Walking
Add a few extra minutes of movement to your day, and you’ll be healthier for it.

Too much sitting during the day is linked to multiple illnesses, including heart disease, diabetes, and even some cancers. And sitting has become an all-too-common activity in the modern workplace. One remedy to the problem is the use of standing desks. However, even standing isn’t enough to keep you at your healthiest. Another important weapon against sitting disease is movement. By adding just 2 minutes of walking every hour, you can increase blood flow to your heart and other muscles. These short bursts of movement “wake the body up” and keep important systems working. If it helps, set a timer on your phone or computer to remind you to walk around at least once every hour. This doesn’t replace the recommendations for getting regular exercise, but it will help keep you active and healthy! Get moving!

Tips for G-TIP

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
Flying under G-forces? Here are tips you can use to improve your G-tolerance during flight.

Training for flight in dynamic and high-acceleration aircraft requires both good cardiovascular health and anaerobic capabilities; part of well-rounded fitness! Have you heard the myth that all fighter pilots are short, stocky, and need high blood pressure? Not true, you too can develop good G-tolerance! Regular cardiovascular conditioning paired with strength-training programs will properly prepare you for flight under Gs. A strong lower body helps push blood upwards where you need it, in your heart and brain. Being aerobically fit gives you the endurance to keep pushing and not fatigue as quickly while doing the Anti-G Straining Maneuver (AGSM). AGSM is a two-component maneuver pilots perform under g-loads that involves breathing and muscle contractions to increase your blood pressure and maintain blood flow to your brain. Read more here

Are you tough enough…mentally?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Tactics, Total Force Fitness
Are you mentally tough? See if you’ve got the 4 Cs. Develop these traits and maintain them.

Mental toughness is a psychological edge that some are born with and others develop. It’s a mixture of traits that are important for all who want to overcome adversity and be successful. These traits include a strong belief in yourself and an unshakable faith that you control your own destiny. It allows you to consistently cope with training and lifestyle demands better than those who don’t have it.

If you have these 4 Cs, you’re mentally tough:

  • Control: You feel in control of your emotions and are influential with the people in your life. 
  • Commitment: You embrace difficulty rather than running from it.
  • Challenge: You believe that life is full of opportunities, not threats.
  • Confidence: You know you have what it takes to be successful.

How to get it? You can gain mental toughness through a long-term process of developing mental skills.  Leaders can specifically promote mental toughness by creating a learning environment centered on the mastery of the 4 Cs. They also can help by generally supporting and encouraging service members to maintain positive relationships. Over the long haul, to maintain and improve your mental toughness, you need to constantly hone your mental skills. And finally, you need a self-driven, insatiable desire to succeed.

What’s cooking? Food safety for summer

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Food, Safety, Summer
Have fun in the sun and stay safe at the grill or in the kitchen with these summertime food safety tips.

It’s the peak of summer, which means barbeques, picnics, and other food-filled events. But especially in summer’s heat, don’t forget about food safety, or it might just spoil your fun. Let the good times roll this summer with these food safety tips:

  • Wash your hands. Washing your hands often is one of the best ways to prevent the spread of bacteria. Remember to use warm water and soap, and wash your hands for at least 20 seconds.
  • Marinate meat safely. Marinate your food in the refrigerator, and keep it there until you’re ready to cook it. If you want to use the marinade as a sauce, set aside a portion before adding your raw meat or poultry, and don’t reuse marinade.
  • Cook food thoroughly.Use a thermometer to ensure your food is cooked to the right minimum internal temperature:
    • Steaks and pork—145°F
    • Hamburgers and sausages—160°F
    • Poultry—165°F
  • Keep cold food cold. Don’t let your cold dishes sit out on a counter for more than 2 hours, or one hour outdoors when temperature is above 90°F. Otherwise, keep it chilled at 40°F or less in a cooler or place directly on ice.

Always remember: “When in doubt, throw it out.” A foodborne illness is not worth the risk. For more information on food safety during the summer, visit “Summer and Vacations” at Foodsafety.gov.

Be assertive

Assertive communication is often the best way to communicate. Aim for a mix of “directive” and “cooperative.”

One of the best ways to express yourself is to be assertive. Assertive communication is neither aggressive nor passive. It’s a balance between issuing a directive and being overly cooperative.

Communication between siblings can provide some good examples. Here’s a too directive approach: “You need to call me too. Don’t make me do all the work to keep up our relationship.” That may make sense to you, but the other person may not take it the way you want because it triggers defensiveness. And here’s the overly cooperative approach: When your sibling says, “I hope you don’t mind that I never call,” you reply, “No, it’s okay, whatever you want is fine” (even if it isn’t).

The best approach would sound something like this: “I’d really like to talk with you, but I know you’re busy. What can we do to stay more in touch?” This approach is basically a combination of “This is what I need” and “Can you join my team to figure out a solution?” It’s straightforward and mutually empowering, opening the door for real communication. Try it and see how it works for you. But once you’ve delivered your message, don’t forget to listen: Read HPRC’s Conflict and Communication FAQ#3.

The best routines aren’t

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Tactics, Total Force Fitness
Routines help athletes and service members achieve their best, but rigid routines can get in the way. Flexibility and adaptation are keys to success.

Routines often can help your performance, but you need to be flexible too. Some of the world’s best athletes have scripted routines that begin with what time they wake up. Top performers find that routines can help shift them from stressful anticipation of how things are going to turn out to focus instead on what’s most important in that moment. In other words, routines can help you reduce anxiety.

But while rigid routines can be useful when the events are predictable, overly rigid routines can morph a helpful tool into a superstitious or obsessive ritual. The best athletes regard flexibility and adaptation as crucial to their own, often finely honed, routines. With service members for whom crises are part of the job, the best teams are able to go “off-script” when needed in order to work together most effectively.

For more information on mental aspects of performance, visit HPRC’s Mind Tactics domain.

Nitric oxide supplements for performance?

Nitric oxide supplements are popular pre-workout supplements, but do they deliver on their promises to boost performance?

Nitric oxide (NO) supplements are marketed to maximize your performance by giving you extra energy and enhancing your focus during workouts so you can train longer and harder. But these supplements don’t contain any nitric oxide, which is a gas. So what’s really in them, and do they work? More important, are they safe to use? Find out in our OPSS FAQ on nitric oxide supplements.

Do you still have questions about dietary supplements? Explore our other Operation Supplement Safety FAQs. If you can’t find the answer there, you can use our “Ask the Expert” button.

Free summer meals for kids

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Children, Diet, Nutrition
Kids can get free, nutritious meals even when school is out. Read more to learn how.

Children and teens are vulnerable to hunger and poor nutrition, especially during the summer months when school is out. This can lead to lower academic performance once school begins again. Poor nutrition also makes kids more prone to illness and other health issues.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) aims to fill this nutrition gap by providing summer meals for children up to age 18. What’s more, it’s free, and children don’t have to enroll to be eligible. They just have to show up and enjoy a healthy meal. (In fact, more than one meal may be available.)

Summer meal sites are located in many communities across the country at places such as schools, community centers, libraries, parks, playgrounds, and faith-based centers. To find a summer meal site in your community, check out USDA’s Summer Meal Site Finder.

Tips to practice safe sun

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Exposure, Heat, Safety, Sun
Protect yourself from the dangers of too much sun this summer and year ‘round.

Skin cancer is a major public health issue, but with proper precautions you can decrease your risk considerably. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the most important risk factor for both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer. Exposure to these rays also can result in deeper facial wrinkles, skin discoloration, burn, and skin aging.

Athletes who practice outdoor sports are especially at risk for skin cancer. Sweating increases the skin’s sensitivity to the sun’s rays, magnifying the risk of sunburn and skin damage.

Remember: The weather does not have to be sunny and hot for you to get sun damage! Whether you’re training for the PRT, patrolling, road marching, or participating in a summer league softball game, follow these tips to stay safe during all outdoor activities. [[Christy – Use the text to this point for the home page BLUF, then add the words “Read more...” and hyperlink to full article, with all text, above and below.]]

  • Avoid burning
    • As little as a single sunburn can increase your risk for developing skin cancer. Getting burned 5 or more times doubles the risk over your lifetime.
  • Apply sunscreen
    • Use water-resistant, broad-spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen, with SPF 15 or higher, every day. Apply it 15–30 minutes before you’re exposed to the sun to give it time to absorb. Also, reapply sunscreen after swimming, sweating, or toweling off. Be sure to check out the FDA regulations regarding sunscreens and their effectiveness.
  • Seek shade
    • Whenever possible, stay in the shade under a tree or tent. Especially try to avoid sun exposure during midday (11 a.m. to 3 p.m.), when the rays are strongest.
  • Cover up
    • Wear protective clothing—including hats, long-sleeved shirts, and pants—when you go outdoors. Keep in mind, though, that protection decreases when clothes are wet.
  • Use extra caution…
    • …near water, snow, and sand. Ultraviolet rays can reflect off these and other surfaces, increasing your chance of sun exposure and skin damage.
  • Wear sunglasses
    • Protect your eyes when you work, drive, participate in sports, take a walk, or run an errand. Solar ultraviolet B radiation can increased your risk of cataracts and cancer of the skin around eyes without proper cover.

Trapped by your thoughts?

The way we think often impacts what we do. This is particularly true in relationships.

How we interpret experiences has a big impact on how we react to them. Your personal relationships are especially prone to “thinking traps” that can lead you to draw false conclusions. For example, let’s say you’ve been married for some time now. But recently you find yourself thinking your partner doesn’t love you any more because she or he no longer says so.

One way to address this kind of thinking trap is to ask yourself—or have a friend ask you—questions that make you think about the reasoning or evidence behind what you’re thinking:

  • What specifically makes you think your spouse doesn’t love you any more?
  • What did he or she do in the past that made you feel loved?
  • Are there any other possible explanations that might explain your partner’s behavior, such as job stress, an ailing parent, children acting out, or recent return from deployment?
  • When you think back to the beginning of your relationship, how could you tell he or she loved you? Was it something said? Or done?
  • Has your behavior toward your spouse changed recently?

Questions such as these can help you gain perspective. Once you’ve gone through this self-questioning process, it’s possible you’ll interpret your partner’s behavior in a different way. Maybe you were just caught up in a thinking trap.

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