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Alerts

RegenESlim Appetite Control Capsules voluntarily recalled due to the presence of DMAA.

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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HPRC Blog

Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

Tainted dietary supplements: How do you know?

Dietary supplements do not require approval by the FDA, so how can you know if the supplement you are considering is tainted? Read on for warning signs and new actions by the FDA that can help.

Tainted dietary supplements most often occur among products typically marketed for weight loss, sexual enhancement, and bodybuilding. They can have deceptive labeling as well as undeclared, harmful ingredients. The question is: How can consumers protect themselves from these products?

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently taken some steps to help consumers look out for potentially harmful dietary supplement products.  Consumers and healthcare professionals can receive notifications from the FDA by subscribing to the RSS feed. The Commissioner of Food and Drugs also sent a letter to the dietary supplement industry reminding them of their responsibility to prevent the sale of tainted products in the United States. The FDA has also made it easier to report to the FDA about tainted products.

Some of these tainted dietary supplement products contain active ingredients of FDA-approved drugs or other compounds that are not classified as dietary ingredients. These products can have serious side effects, including death. The FDA has identified roughly 300 tainted products that are not legal dietary supplements and are warning consumers about the serious side effects of these products. Consumers should be cautious of:

  • Product ads that claim to “melt your fat away,” or claim that “diet and exercise [are] not required,” or products that use the words “guaranteed,” “scientific breakthrough,” or “totally safe.”
  • Products that use numerous testimonials about “results seen” from using the product.
  • Any product that is labeled or marketed in a foreign language. Consumers should not buy or consume these products.
  • Products that are marketed as herbal alternatives to FDA-approved drugs.
  • Products marketed and sold on the Internet.

    There have been some recent voluntary recalls due to FDA investigations of dietary supplement products. Some of these have included weight-loss products that contained the prescription drug ingredient sibutramine. Sexual enhancement products have also been recalled for containing the undeclared drug ingredients sulfosildenafil and tadalafil. Other products marketed as supplements have been identified as containing various prescription drug ingredients.

    It is important that consumers be aware that, under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994, companies do not need FDA approval prior to marketing such products. Thus, generally speaking, the FDA does not approve dietary supplements.

    Consumers need to be savvy when they make product purchases, and when in doubt, check with a healthcare professional or registered dietitian to determine if you need a dietary supplement product and to help determine what could be a tainted product. If it looks too good to be true, chances are it is.  For more information, read the “FDA’s Beware of Fraudulent ‘Dietary Supplements’.”

    Monitor your physical performance using your heart rate

    HPRC Fitness Arena:
    Your heart is the key to effective training. Learn how to monitor it during exercise to achieve the optimum results from your training program.

    Monitor your heart rate to ensure that you are training in the appropriate range for your performance needs. This simple practice will help you track the way your body responds to training to effectively optimize your physical performance. The American Council on Exercise (ACE) has information on how to monitor your exercise intensity using your heart rate, as well as an online tool for calculating your target heart rate. A similar online calculator is available from the Army’s Hooah 4 Health website.

    Survey: Half of Americans use dietary supplements

    HPRC Fitness Arena:
    Filed under: Dietary supplements
    CNN.com is reporting on a new government study which reports that more than half of American adults take at least one dietary supplement. But despite their popularity, many experts remain skeptical of their effects.

    CNN.com is reporting on a new government study which reports more than half of American adults take at least one dietary supplement. But despite their popularity, many experts remain skeptical of their effects.The study, sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics, found that more than 40 percent of Americans used supplements from 1988 to 1994, but by 2006 more than half were doing so. Multivitamins were found to be the most commonly used supplement.

     

    Navy fitness through NOFFS

    HPRC Fitness Arena:
    This Navy fitness program focuses on basic and performance nutrition alongside physical training exercises designed to target operational tasks and reduce injuries.

    The Navy Operational Fitness and Fueling Series (NOFFS) provides the Navy with "best in class" physical fitness and nutrition performance information for both Sailors and Navy health and fitness professionals. NOFFS instructs individuals on how to train effectively and safely and how to make healthy nutrition choices in both shore-based and operational environments.

    Based on worldwide mission requirements, which require the Navy to intensity its operational tempo, it’s imperative for Sailors to be physically fit. Physical fitness is an essential component of operational readiness and the ability to meet deployment schedules. Sailor resiliency and durability are the primary goals of the development and distribution of NOFFS.

    The purpose of NOFFS is to provide a complete physical training program that will eliminate the guesswork for:

    • The individual Sailor who is participating in his/her personal physical training program
    • The Navy health and fitness professional who is interested in obtaining a ready-made comprehensive and biomechanically balanced individual or group physical training program.

      The goals of NOFFS are to:

      • Improve operational performance
      • Provide basic and performance nutrition guidance.
      • Decrease the incidence and severity of musculoskeletal injuries associated with physical training.

        NOFFS provides Sailors with an evidence-based performance tool that will address injury prevention by physically training the movement patterns of operational tasks. Rather than focusing specifically on the physical readiness test (PRT), NOFFS emphasizes how to specifically improve the functional performance of a Sailor during daily operations. This includes lifting, pushing, pulling, carrying, aerobic/anaerobic demands, and body movement skills requiring balance, agility, and coordination. The focus of the project is to optimize operational physical performance and fueling for Sailors while preserving Navy combat power.

        For more information about NOFFS and other Navy Fitness initiatives, visit www.navyfitness.org.

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        Dietary supplements: Questions and answers

        HPRC Fitness Arena:
        The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) answers consumers' questions about dietary supplements and the regulations of dietary supplements.

        The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has information for consumers regarding dietary supplements: Questions and answers, regulations, and safety alerts. Click here for their website.

        Beware of Fraudulent Weight-Loss "Dietary Supplements"

        HPRC Fitness Arena:
        The FDA warns against weight-loss products which don't live up to their claims and can potentially cause serious harm.

        The FDA warns against weight-loss products which don't live up to their claims and can potentially cause serious harm. Dozens of products have been found being marketed as dietary supplements which contain hidden prescription drugs or compounds that have not been adequately studied in humans.

        For more information, click here [PDF].

        Beware of Fraudulent "Dietary Supplements"

        HPRC Fitness Arena:
        Federal regulators continue to warn consumers about tainted, dangerous products that are marketed as dietary supplements.

        The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has found nearly 300 fraudulent products–promoted mainly for weight loss, sexual enhancement, and bodybuilding–that contain hidden or deceptively labeled ingredients.

        Click here for more information [PDF].

        Army unveils new fitness test

        HPRC Fitness Arena:
        New changes are on the horizon for Army fitness testing.

        In this new era of military human performance optimization, soldiers can forget about doing sit-ups. For the first time in 30 years, the Army has updated its fitness testing to better prepare soldiers for the demands of combat. CNN Health online reports that the Army replacing its Physical Fitness Test with an Army Physical Readiness Test. Changes to the fitness test include reducing the run for soldiers from two miles to 1.5 miles and replacing traditional drills such as sit-ups with "rowers."

         

        Calorie labels for restaurants and vending machines?

        HPRC Fitness Arena:
        Concerned about calories when you eat out? The FDA is proposing calorie labeling for restaurants, food establishments, and vending machines with more than 20 locations.

        The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has proposed calorie labeling for chain restaurants and similar retail food establishments, as well as for vending machines. The move is a response in part to the obesity problem in the U.S. and is seen as a way for consumers to have consistent nutritional information when they make food choices. Read the FDA’s “Questions and Answers on the New Menu and Vending Machines Nutrition Labeling Requirements” for more information

        High Intensity Training (HIT) conference presentations

        HPRC Fitness Arena:
        High Intensity Training (HIT) conference presentations are now available on our website.

        High Intensity Training (HIT) conference presentations are now available on our website. These presentations provide informative information on this hot topic.

        Click here to access the presentations.

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