You are here: Home / HPRC Blog
RSS Feed

HPRC Blog

Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

High Intensity Training (HIT) conference presentations

HPRC Fitness Arena:
High Intensity Training (HIT) conference presentations are now available on our website.

High Intensity Training (HIT) conference presentations are now available on our website. These presentations provide informative information on this hot topic.

Click here to access the presentations.

Journal entry icon

Food dyes and hyperactivity: Is there a link?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
In the debate over food dyes and hyperactivity in children, the FDA feels there is not enough evidence to support any action.

Red 40, Yellow 5, Yellow 6, and other dyes are artificial colorings allowed in foods in the U.S., yet there is a long-standing debate over whether food dyes contribute to hyperactivity in children. The Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Food Advisory Committee met the last week of March and determined that there is not enough evidence to support the link between food dyes and hyperactivity in children. For now, there will be no warning labels on food products containing dyes.

Journal entry icon

Determine your ideal body weight

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Your optimal body weight depends on many factors; ACE offers information that will help you determine what is ideal for you.

Body weight may be used as a measure of overall health by calculating your body mass index (BMI) and may also be used as an indicator of your health risks, particularly if you have more body fat than recommended. Read this answer from the American Council on Exercise to learn more about your ideal body weight. The Army’s Hooah 4 Health website also has online calculators for body mass index and optimal body weight.

Can eating a big breakfast help you lose weight?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
A recent German study provides evidence to challenge the common belief that eating a big breakfast can help you lose weight.

You may have heard time and time again that breakfast is the most important meal of the day and that eating a big breakfast could help you lose weight. One explanation for this claim is that starting the day with a big breakfast prevents food cravings and induces weight loss. Is this true? And is there scientific evidence to support this claim?

Some scientific findings suggest that consuming an energy-rich breakfast causes a person to eat less during the rest of the day. Other findings suggest that increasing the size of breakfast is linked to overall greater food intake. A WebMD article examined this conflicting evidence in light of a recent study conducted by a group of German scientists at the Else-Kroner-Fresenius Center of Nutritional Medicine, Technical University of Munich. Naturally, a study has to be well designed and executed in order for the results to hold up to scrutiny by the scientific community. In this case, which involved a large group of participants, several measures were introduced to encourage accurate record keeping and sound statistics to analyze the results.

Generally speaking, the study suggests that individuals who consume bigger breakfasts in hopes of losing weight may actually end up consuming more calories than anticipated, as they are likely to eat the same amounts of food during lunch and dinner that they would following a small breakfast. This particular finding is worth sharing because it creates awareness of this behavior and may encourage people to consciously watch what they eat for lunch and dinner if they do have a big breakfast or, alternatively, reduce the size of their breakfast. This could be a key for people in their efforts to maintain or lose weight.

All the same, we wish to remind readers that there is no magic formula when it comes to losing weight. Well, maybe there is…

Higher Caloric Expenditure + Lower Caloric Intake = Weight Loss

This is a good general formula to keep in mind in your efforts to lose or maintain your weight. So for instance, while being physically active increases your caloric expenditure, reducing a high-fat diet lowers your caloric intake. And in this instance, refraining from eating a bigger breakfast than usual could contribute to reducing your caloric intake for the day.

In short, we encourage you to eat regular, healthy meals. However, if you decide to eat a bigger-than-usual breakfast, balance it out by eating less during the rest of the day. We hope that the results of this study help you make informed decisions about the number of calories you consume for breakfast.

Family Matters: Military Youth Risk-Taking Behavior

HPRC Fitness Arena:
In a study of military youth, risk-taking behavior was compared to national and state averages. How did they rank?

In a study of military youth, risk-taking behavior was compared to national and state averages. The researchers found that risk-taking behaviors among military youth—specifically, sexual activity and substance abuse—were much lower than national and state averages. However, there were still reports of risk-taking behaviors among military youth, so the authors caution not to misinterpret this information—even military children still need guidance. For more information on risk-taking behaviors, visit the HPRC's Mind Tactics "Performance Degraders" section.

FDA Alert: FDA Warns Consumers to Stop Using Soladek Vitamin Solution

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a warning about a vitamin solution, Soladek; samples that were tested contained dangerously high levels of vitamins A and D.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a warning about a vitamin solution, Soladek; samples that were tested contained dangerously high levels of vitamins A and D.  The FDA has advised consumers currently using this product to stop immediately.

For more information, read the FDA warning.

The calorie label initiative: How many calories are in your beverage?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Following a lead from First Lady Michelle Obama to combat obesity, several beverage-industry companies are voluntarily putting the total calories on the front labels of their non-alcoholic beverages.

Following a lead from First Lady Michelle Obama to combat obesity, several beverage-industry companies are voluntarily putting the total calories on the front labels of their non-alcoholic beverages. The American Beverage Association’s 2010 “Clear on Calories” initiative directed that beverage containers of 20 ounces or less carry total calories, while larger containers identify calories per 12 ounces, with full implementation by 2012. For more information, read a news release about this new initiative.

Journal entry icon

Get enough sleep!

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Tactics
Filed under: Healthy Tips, Sleep
If you need an alarm clock to wake up in the morning, then it’s possible you’re not getting enough sleep.

If you need an alarm clock to wake up in the morning, then it’s possible you’re not getting enough sleep. The optimum amount of sleep needed varies from person to person, and how much you need may change over time. Sleep loss increases your risk for high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, and weight gain. When you can wake up feeling refreshed and without an alarm clock, you know you have gotten enough sleep! Check out these resources for more details:

Journal entry icon

Be constructive and communicate

HPRC Fitness Arena:
In successful marriages, partners work out problems by talking to each other.

Research shows that particular styles of fighting often lead to divorce. In successful marriages, both partners are willing to work out problems by talking to each other.  If one partner withdraws, the other may perceive that as lack of interest in the relationship, and the likelihood of divorce is high. Successful couples empathize with each other and handle conflict constructively. For more information on how to better communicate with your partner, please visit our Family Skills page.

Lazy Cakes: Brownies – or something else?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
With added melatonin to help you relax, this is no typical brownie.

Lazy Cakes Relaxation Brownies claim to “have relaxation built into every bite.” One brownie (half is the recommended serving size) contains 3 mg of melatonin, a hormone made by the body but also available as a supplement that is often used to treat sleep disorders and jet lag. Selling these brownies as a dietary supplement allows the manufacturer to avoid FDA regulation for foods and beverages. The label warns consumers not to drive or operate heavy machinery and to consult your physician if you are taking medication or are pregnant or nursing; it also says the product is recommended for adults only. Buyers beware…this is no typical brownie.

RSS Feed