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Alerts

RegenESlim Appetite Control Capsules voluntarily recalled due to the presence of DMAA.

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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HPRC Blog

Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

Go for Green®: The basics

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Get the scoop on DoD’s new food-identification program designed to help you optimize your nutrition.

Have you heard about Go for Green®?

Go for Green® is a DoD-wide, joint-service food-identification program. It’s designed to help you easily identify the nutritional value of foods when you’re standing in line at the dining facility (DFAC) deciding what to eat.

Foods in DFACs are color-coded Green, Yellow, or Red to help you choose foods for optimal performance. When using Go for Green® in the DFAC, look for these symbols to identify “Green,” “Yellow,” or “Red” foods.

What do the colors mean?

Menu Label Green [JPG]Menu Bus Card Green [JPG]

Go: High-Performance Food

Green” foods can and should be eaten everyday. These foods score high in nutrient density (the ratio of nutrients to calories in a food) and help you perform best. Most “Green” foods can be eaten without having to worry much about portion size.

Menu Label Yellow [JPG]Menu Bus Card Yellow [JPG]

Caution: Eat occasionally

Yellow” foods are still healthy in small amounts but should be eaten less often than “Green” foods. How much and how often depends on your health and performance goals. Try to eat “Yellow” foods just some of the time.

Menu Label Red [JPG]Menu Bus Card Red [JPG]

Limit: Eat rarely

Red” foods are meant to be treats eaten just once in a while. They have little nutritional quality but are often an enjoyable part of eating. Most people can have a few “Red” foods each week and still meet health and performance goals. Try to limit how much and how often you eat “Red” foods, and balance them with plenty of “Green” foods.

Although the Go for Green® program is geared toward use in the DFAC, it translates well to just about any setting—home, fast-food restaurants, even when eating MREs. Eating the Go for Green® way can promote a healthier, better-performing you. For more information, visit the Go for Green® website. Download the Go for Green® Guide for a handy reference.

Need help deciding how much to eat? Look for future posts about how to personalize Go for Green® based on your individual calorie and performance needs.

Switch up your heart rate a bit: Heart Rate Variability 101

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Tactics, Total Force Fitness
Your heart rate is (hopefully!) not steady; it should vary. The more it does so—rhythmically—the better for health and performance. And you have the power to influence it.

“Heart rate variability,” a way to track how your heart rate rhythmically goes up and down, helps you objectively assess your mind-body optimization. When your heart rate varies more, it’s good for your health and performance. Breathing at certain paces has a big impact on heart rate variability and—in turn—the mind-body connection and performance. And because you can learn to control your breathing, you can also improve your HRV. For more information about HRV and breathing to increase your HRV, read HPRC’s “Vary Your Heart Rate to Perform Your Best.”

Tips for staying in touch during deployment

Deploying soon? Think about a game plan for communicating with your loved one. HPRC offers some tips.

Deployment can be a challenge for couples, but it can also be a time of potential growth for a relationship. Questions invariably arise such as, “How much should I share with my partner? How often can we talk?” Some couples easily develop a dynamic that works for them; for others, the feeling of closeness is hard to hold on to when one partner is far away. Whether it’s your first deployment or you’re a seasoned veteran, here are some tips you can add to your deployment arsenal:

  • Balance talk of "everyday" things with more-intimate conversations about deeper feelings and meaning.
  • When there’s a lull in communication, whether it’s a day or a few weeks (due to mission requirements), think about creative ways to stay feeling connected such as journaling, burning video-diary messages on a DVD, or writing cards or letters.
  • Communicate marriage-related emotions that come up during deployment; don’t put them off for later.
  • If you’ve been through deployments before, think and talk about what worked for each of you and what you would like to do next time. Sometimes couples want the same things, but more often each person has different or even opposing wants. When this happens, it’s a good time to practice problem solving to find compromises that address each person’s desires as much as possible.
  • Take good care of yourself and use your favorite stress-management techniques. Stress can increase the likelihood of getting into fights with your loved ones!
  • Finally, don’t forget to weave appreciation for your partner into your conversations; read "Thankful for you?" to learn why appreciation is important for couples.

But most important: Figure out what works best for you. For more ideas on strengthening relationships check out HPRC’s Relationship Enhancement section.

Too loud for you to hear?

There are some tips you can use to prevent exposure to hazardous noise levels recreationally and occupationally.

A staggering number of Americans (approximately 36 million) have hearing loss, and one-third of those probably could have been prevented. Hearing loss continues to be a safety hazard for Warfighters at home and in the field. So how do we combat this not-so-silent epidemic?  Here are a few tips to help you protect your hearing.

  • Wear a hearing protective device (HPD). HPDs should be worn for noise levels at or above 85dB. Not sure what 85dB really means? Check out this guide to occupational noise levels.  Also check out “How Loud is Too Loud?,” a graphic designed to inform Warfighters about how and when to choose the proper HPD for their jobs.
  • Learn how to wear your HPD correctly. Even if you have the correct protection, it may not be effective if you’re not wearing it correctly.
  • Always have disposable HPDs handy. Disposable HPDs are lightweight and easily portable. Make them a part of your everyday gear.

For more information about how to protect yourself against or to seek help for hearing loss check out the DoD Hearing Center of Excellence website or make an appointment with your local hearing loss treatment center.

Stay injury free with our new strategies!

Filed under: Injuries, Prevention
HPRC continues to expand its valuable strategies for injury prevention.

HPRC previously ran an Injury Prevention series with some general information to help keep you off profile. A new addition to the series is Injury Prevention Strategies, which will include information for the knees (specifically the anterior cruciate ligament or ACL), ankles, shoulders, and back. Check back often for the next in the series, and keep your body functioning at the top of its game!

Sleep and the Warfighter

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Tactics, Total Force Fitness
Get help optimizing sleep with help from HPRC’s new infographic and other resources about getting your best rest.

Sleep is essential for optimal performance. Especially Warfighters, though, it can be hard to come by. Lack of adequate sleep, called “sleep debt,” can result in reduced mental and physical performance (see HPRC's "How much sleep does a Warfighter need?"). Use HPRC’s “Sleep & Warfighters” infographic to learn how sleep impacts your health and performance, as well as tips to get your best rest. For more in-depth information on optimizing sleep, visit our Sleep Optimization page.

Build a better team

Group “cohesiveness” can contribute to Warfighter success. Learn how groups can establish and foster it.

There are so many parts to being successful in theater that it can be tough to pinpoint what contributes to success. But research has established one part—cohesiveness—that does help Warfighter performance. In fact, cohesiveness—a group’s ability to remain united while pursuing its goals and objectives—is an important piece of the puzzle for any successful group, whether we’re talking about sports teams, squads, platoons, or other kinds.

Cohesiveness can be social (among people who like each other) or task-focused (among people who work well together) or both. In groups such as athletic teams, connecting with a task focus is far more important for performance than connecting socially. Connecting through a task focus is clearly important for Warfighters too, but the stakes are higher: Warfighters often put their lives—not the outcome of a game—in each other’s hands. And cohesiveness has other benefits, such as helping with job satisfaction and overall well-being.

In order to build and maintain team/unit cohesion, experts suggest the following:

  • Use influence effectively—for collective gain, not individual gain.
  • Communicate clearly—give clear expectations for roles, performance, and deadlines, and offer praise.
  • Minimize conflict between unit members.
  • Build trust within the unit and with leadership by showing interest and concern for one another.
  • Establish a positive command climate that supports teamwork yet allows for each member’s independence.
  • Have a shared sense of responsibility for the overall welfare of everyone in the unit and the team as a whole.
  • Value connections within the team as well as between units and organizations.
  • Focus on the strengths of the group, not just its problems and challenges.
  • Build resilience at the individual and group level.

Warfighters and leaders can shape norms—both formally through policy and informally through practice—so that units/groups stick together on multiple levels. For more information on building relationships visit HPRC’s Family & Relationships domain, and for more information about Total Force Fitness check out HPRC’s Total Force Fitness domain.

Antibacterial soaps – beneficial or not?

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Hygiene, Risks
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) plans to revise their guidelines for the use and production of antibacterial soaps

The word “antibacterial” is all too familiar to 21st-century consumers. Soaps and cleaning products that tout “antibacterial” or “kills germs” in large print seem to be everywhere. So it may surprise you to learn that recent studies suggest the use of antibacterial soaps may not be as beneficial as once thought. Research now shows that overuse of these soaps contributes to antibiotic resistance, which makes bacteria stronger and less responsive to antibiotic treatment—a potentially major problem in combat zones and hospitals. In addition, recent animal studies have shown that triclosan, the most common active ingredient in antibacterial soaps, may alter the way hormones work in the body. While these soaps are sometimes necessary in hospital settings, scientists caution against using them in our everyday lives.

FDA will now require that over-the-counter antibacterial soaps must prove that their benefit to a consumer’s health is greater than the current risk for harm to the user and the environment. Manufacturers of over-the-counter antibacterial soaps will be given until December 16, 2014, to provide this evidence or FDA will ban their products.

The ban will not affect hand sanitizers and soaps used in hospital settings. To learn more about the proposed ban of antibacterial soaps, read the FDA consumer update.

Tunes and training

Do you listen to music when you exercise? Find out how it affects your workout.

Do you exercise to music? If you do, you might have noticed that you run faster when a fast-paced, upbeat tune comes on.

Exercise scientists noticed the relationship between exercise and music some time ago. For those of us who aren’t trained athletes, music can have a huge effect on our performance and mood during exercise. Without realizing it, people push themselves harder during exercise when listening to fast-tempo music, which increases heart rate as well as speed, endurance, and in some cases the rate of perceived exertion. Exercisers also feel an improved sense of well-being when working out to music.

So why is it you prefer certain songs when you’re exercising? One explanation suggests that a part of your brain tries to match the movement of your body to the beat of the music. In fact, scientists have found that when you listen to music with about 125–140 beats per minute, both your heartbeat and your movements synchronize to work at the most energy-efficient, optimal level for exercise. In essence, music works with your brain to coordinate your bodily functions and optimize your workout.

The best workout songs seem to share certain characteristics:

  • 125-140 beats per minute during exercise; slower for warm-ups, cool-downs, and for some endurance-type exercises
  • A motivational or upbeat message
  • Familiar tunes or a preferred style of music
  • A tempo that matches the rhythm of your exercise

Ask your buddies about their workout playlists too. They might have something totally different to offer—a new beat to stay fit with.

For more tips on how to optimize your workout, explore HPRC’s Physical Fitness domain.

Keep your eyes on the road

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Tactics, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Driving, Safety
Distracted driving is dangerous. Check out this resource dedicated to minimizing distractions and increasing your focus on the road.

Have you found yourself checking your phone while driving? Is it more than just occasionally? Driving while distracted is simply unsafe. According to the official U.S. government website (see link below), distracted driving “is any activity that could divert a person’s attention away from the primary task of driving”—such as texting, using a cell phone, checking your hair or makeup, shaving, brushing your teeth, or just talking to your passengers. The “most alarming distraction,” according to their site, is texting, and they give an example of how it makes you blind to the road for the entire length of a football field. According to the Department of Defense Instruction 6055.04 (April 20, 2009; Incorporating Change 2, January 23, 2013), all drivers should refrain from text messaging, using cell phones, or using other hand-held electronic devices unless the vehicle is safely parked or the person is using a hands-free device. This regulation is for everyone’s safety, so put your phone away. Keep your eyes on the road and don’t drive distracted. For more information, including frequently asked questions, check out distraction.gov.

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