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Alerts

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

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Filed under: FDA

FDA Alert: Recall of E. coli contaminated hazelnuts

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The FDA posted an alert on an E. coli outbreak that has caused at least 7 illnesses in Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin that involves hazelnuts likely grown and harvested in Oregon.

The FDA posted an alert on an E. coli outbreak that involves hazelnuts by DeFranco & Sons, which has voluntarily recalled bulk and bagged in-shell hazelnuts and mixed-nut products. The recalled products have been linked to seven cases of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin and may cause serious illness.

Click on link below to access the article.

FDA: E. coli O157:H7 cases linked to hazelnuts

FDA Recall Alert: Fruta Planta weight loss dietary supplements

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Godi International, Corp., located in South Florida is announcing a recall of Fruta Planta weight loss dietary supplements.

Godi International, Corp., located in South Florida is announcing a recall of Fruta Planta weight loss dietary supplements because the products contain Sibutramine an undeclared drug ingredient. Sibutramine is an FDA approved drug used as an appetite suppressant for weight loss. This poses a potential threat to consumers because Sibutramine is known to substantially increase blood pressure and/or pulse rate in some patients and may present a significant risk for patients with a history of coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias or stroke.

Click below to access the recall alert.

Recall of All weight loss formulas and variation of formulas of Reduce Weight Fruta Planta/Reduce Weight Dietary Supplement

Tainted Products Marketed as Dietary Supplements

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The FDA announces a letter to all dietary supplement trade associations about the growing problem of misbranded drugs masquerading as dietary supplements.

The FDA held a press conference on 12/15/2010 announcing that it was sending a letter to all dietary supplement trade associations, as well as posting a message to consumers, about the growing problem related to the sale of various misbranded drug products masquerading as "dietary supplements."

Click on link to read the announcement.
Click here for the [PDF] file.

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FTC and FDA examine Nestle's move into the functional food market segment

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The September 27, 2010 edition of the Wall Street Journal 's Health Blog reports that food giant Nestle is looking to expand their stake in "functional foods" - foods that might prevent diseases.

Bowl of fresh salad

The September 27, 2010 edition of the Wall Street Journal 's Health Blog reports that food giant Nestle' is looking to expand their stake in "functional foods" - foods that might prevent diseases. According to the article, the company is investing over $500 million into research in order to get a foothold into the functional food market. This move comes on the heels of yesterdays news that the Foot Trade Commission (FTC) is suing the maker of a popular pomegranate fruit drink, POM Wonderful LLC, in a widening effort by the government to clamp down on food ads that tout specific health benefits.

It remains to be seen how this will play out.

According to the press release, Nestlé will create a wholly owned subsidiary, Nestlé Health Science, as well as a research body, the Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences, “to pioneer a new industry between food and pharma,” the company said in a statement.

The article can be accessed here.

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Herbal supplements face new scrutiny

HPRC Fitness Arena:
There is a growing trend in the U.S. of consumers using a variety of dietary supplements in hopes of getting healthier, warding off disease and easing symptoms of various conditions. A recent Wall Street Journal article reports that the federal government is stepping up research into the safety and effectiveness of a wide range of products to help consumers make more informed choices about supplements.

There is a growing trend in the U.S. of consumers using a variety of dietary supplements in hopes of getting healthier, warding off disease and easing symptoms of various conditions.

In a September 14, 2010 article, The Wall Street Journal reports that the federal government is stepping up research into the safety and effectiveness of a wide range of products to help consumers make more informed choices about supplements. The article in full-text can be accessed here.

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Risky marketing: Dietary supplements and teen athletics

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The Columbus Dispatch (Ohio) recently ran a five-day series titled "Little leagues, big costs" In this series, The Dispatch explores where youth sports have taken wrong turns in recent years.

The Columbus Dispatch (Ohio) recently ran a five-day series titled "Little leagues, big costs" In this series, The Dispatch explores where youth sports have taken wrong turns in recent years.

The link below from that series contains an article that focuses on the dangers of how some unregulated dietary supplements are being targeted at teens

Supplements target teens, pose dangers and are virtually unregulated

 

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Consumer Reports® report finds dangerous dietary supplements

HPRC Fitness Arena:
In a report from the September 2010 issue of Consumer Reports®, the twelve most dangerous dietary supplements posing health risks have been identified.

In a report from the September 2010 issue of Consumer Reports®,   the twelve most dangerous dietary supplements posing health risks have been identified. According to the report, these are dietary supplements which are taken by millions of Americans and have been found to cause serious health problems, including cardiovascular, liver, and kidney problems.

Read the report here.

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The regulation of dietary supplements

HPRC Fitness Arena:
When you choose a multivitamin or supplement from the store, have you ever wondered how to choose?

When you choose a multivitamin or supplement from the store, have you ever wondered how to choose? Or if there’s any regulation to ensure the one you choose is safe, and that you’re getting what you’re paying for? Regulation is perhaps the least understood aspect of the dietary supplement industry. We, here at HPRC, hope we can shed some light on the matter. Look for the quickest way to ensure quality and safety in your supplements at the end of the article.

Dietary supplements are regulated, but not as strictly as many might want. Oversight of dietary supplements began with the 1994 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA). Since supplements are intended to supplement one’s diet, they are regulated the way food is, and not as drugs are. Under DSHEA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates dietary supplements by holding manufacturers accountable in five important areas: Manufacturers are required to ensure that the supplement is safe; make truthful claims; abide by current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMPs); submit to FDA all reports of serious adverse events, and notify FDA before it markets a supplement containing a “new dietary ingredient” (NDI).

What consumers should know is that manufacturers cannot sell unsafe, ineffective supplements; they have to document that their product will not harm anyone, and provide convincing evidence that the product does what it claims. To further ensure safety and effectiveness, the FDA closely regulates supplement labels for accuracy and honesty. All information on the label must be truthful and conform to all FDA standards. It has to list the sources of all components, and the amount of key nutrients and ingredients. Manufacturers are also required to report to the FDA before marketing supplements containing new dietary ingredients, which must have data supporting safety of the ingredient. The FDA also regulates manufacturing standards using the current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) to ensure product quality and safety. Violation of cGMP is a violation of the law. Lastly, the FDA requires manufacturers to report on serious adverse events that may occur from consumers using their products.

Despite this oversight, there’s a misconception that dietary supplements are not regulated. This could be because supplements don’t require pre-market approval, and the post-market responsibility of FDA simply ensures compliance with the regulations listed above. The downside of this is that some unsafe and contaminated products end up on the market. Once there, the FDA has to prove that the product is unsafe (or show that the information on its label is untruthful or misleading), before it can be removed from the market. Also, although supplement labels are highly regulated, the content of separate brochures and fliers is not subject to FDA rules.

Enforcing regulations take time and resources. Since the cGMP rule went into effect in June 2008, the FDA has conducted approximately 55 inspections for compliance with the new regulations – and in light of the thousands of companies manufacturing supplements, there’s some dissatisfaction with the progress of the FDA.

So how can you protect yourself, as a consumer, from ineffective or even potentially unsafe supplements? There’s a simple answer: When purchasing dietary supplements, choose products approved by independent organizations that offer certification or verification. Look for supplements whose labels display a seal from the  United States Pharmacopeia (USP), the non-profit NSF International, or the Natural Products Association (NPA). Since these verifications are voluntary and are performed at the company’s expense, you can be certain that approved products have little or no contaminants, that the ingredients are present in the labeled amounts, and the labels are accurate.

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FDA and supplements

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Read on to learn more about how to choose dietary supplements.

The FDA does not strictly regulate dietary supplements. As a result, supplements may not be as pure as stated on the label and may have potentially harmful contaminants. When purchasing dietary supplements, choose products approved by United States Pharmacopeia (USP) or other reputable sources.

For more information, click here for the FDA's information on dietary supplements.

The FDA's consumer information on dietary supplements.

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