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Alerts

RegenESlim Appetite Control Capsules voluntarily recalled due to the presence of DMAA.

FDA warns consumers about caffeine powder. 

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Filed under: Safety

DMAA-containing products in question

HPRC offers a list of products containing DMAA to help you make informed decisions in buying dietary supplements.

Dietary supplement products containing DMAA have been temporarily removed from military stores by the AAFES, but they are still available on the public retail market. HPRC has prepared a list of many of these products to help you watch for them if you are considering the purchase of dietary supplements. DMAA is found most commonly in products sold for bodybuilding or weight loss, but it can also be found in other performance-enhancing products, as well as in recreational party pills. The list also includes other names for DMAA that may be found on product labels. To download the list, go to the Dietary Supplements Resources page under the “Resources” tab, or just click on this link to directly access “Dietary Supplement Products Containing DMAA.”

Department of Defense removes DMAA-containing dietary supplements from exchanges

HPRC Fitness Arena: Dietary Supplements
DMAA-containing dietary supplements at military exchanges have been temporarily removed from shelves.

Due to concerns about possible serious adverse health effects, the Department of Defense (DoD) has put a medical hold on the sale of weight-loss and bodybuilding products containing 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA), also referred to as methylhexanamine, Geranamine, and geranium oil, extract, or stems and leaves, from military exchanges.

An extensive investigation will take place to determine the safety of DMAA in dietary supplement products, as well as an educational campaign to assist Warfighters and their families in making informed choices.

For more information, please see the Question and Answers fact sheet by the Directorate of Strategic Communications, Office of the Surgeon General.

Products containing DMAA temporarily removed from AAFES stores

The AAFES is pulling products that contain DMAA from its shelves and will no longer see anything with this potentially dangerous substance.

The Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES) has temporarily removed products containing 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA), also referred to as methylhexanamine, Geranamine, and geranium oil, extract, or stems and leaves from its stores. DMAA is increasingly being associated with serious adverse events. For additional information about the recent AAFES decision, read the Stars and Stripes article. We have also put together a list of products containing DMAA carried by AAFES for your information.

A list of products containing DMAA carried by AAFES (to include GNC) includes:

USPlabs Jack3d (Tropical Fruit and Lemon Lime)

USPlabs OxyELITE Pro

Nutrex Research Lipo-6 Black (his and hers)

Nutrex Research Lipo-6 Black Ultra Concentrate (his and hers)

Nutrex Research Hemo-Rage Black Powder, Punch, Berry

iSatori PWR

Muscletech NeuroCore

Muscletech HydroxyStim

Fahrenheit Nutrition Lean EFX

Muscle Warfare Napalm

SNI Nitric Blast

BIORhythm SSIN Juice

MuscleMeds Code Red

SEI MethylHex 4,2

Gaspari Nutrition Spirodex

Marines address boot camp injuries

Reducing injuries during boot camp is a priority for the Marine Corps; athletic trainers keep watch over recruits to ensure the 13-week training is as injury-free as possible.

The Los Angeles Times is reporting on how the Marine Corps has hired 27 certified athletic trainers—most with experience tending professional and college athletes—to oversee training for enlisted recruits and officer candidates at sites throughout the United States. According to the article, this is a new direction for the Corps: Not that long ago, the drill instructors might have dismissed recruits who complained of being injured and ordered them back into action.

To learn more about military recommendations for prevention of injuries related to physical training related, visit the HPRC’s Injury Management page and click on the link to read Recommendations for Prevention of Physical Training (PT)-Related Injuries.

Products containing DMAA gone from AAFES stores

The AAFES is pulling products that contain DMAA from its shelves and will no longer sell anything with this potentially dangerous substance.

The Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES) has banned the sale of products containing 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA), also referred to as methylhexanamine, Geranamine, and geranium oil, extract, or stems and leaves. All products containing DMAA have been pulled from store shelves. DMAA is increasingly being associated with serious adverse events. For additional information about the recent AAFES decision, read the Stars and Stripes article.

Get the latest scoop on multivitamins

New multivitamins/minerals fact sheets for consumers and health professionals are now available from the Office of Dietary Supplements.

The Office of Dietary Supplements has released new fact sheets on multivitamin/mineral supplements. The QuickFacts version was designed for consumers; health professionals and those who want to know more can get additional detailed information from the Fact Sheet.

Progressive overload injuries

Don’t get injured by trying to do too much too soon. Ramp up your exercise regimen slowly and steadily to avoid getting hurt—and having to start over.

Overuse injuries are a common risk associated with the rigors of physical training. A healthy tip to implement into your training program is to gradually increase your training workload by just 10% each week. This will help—but not guarantee—to reduce the risk of muscle or joint injury such as tendonitis or stress fractures caused by repetitive trauma. In essence, keep the progressive changes in your activity levels gradual, listen to your body, and make incremental adjustments in time and intensity until you reach your new fitness goals.

What is Supplement Safety Now?

Supplement Safety Now is a public safety initiative to help consumers know if an OTC supplement is safe to use.

A myriad of dietary supplements make their way to the market labeled as “healthy” for the public. However, many contain dangerous substances, including steroids, and consumers have no idea they are taking harmful substances. Supplement Safety Now, a public protection initiative, was founded by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency to make sure over-the-counter supplements are safe for consumers. For more information, read more about this initiative.

Reporting adverse events associated with dietary supplement use

Reporting adverse events from dietary supplement use is essential for determining the safety of available products and ingredients.

Many adverse events associated with dietary supplement use go unreported. HPRC has developed one page information resources on how to report adverse events. Warfighters and their families can follow the directions for reporting adverse events to MedWatch (FDA) and Natural Medicines Watch. In addition to these sites, Health care providers can follow step by step directions for reporting via AHLTA.

Food contamination with Listeria monocytogenes

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Food contaminated with Listeria can cause a deadly infection.

Recently there has been a multistate outbreak of listeriosis from cantaloupes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has an informative report about listeriosis, including symptoms, food contamination, and how to take steps to avoid this serious infection.

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