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Alerts

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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Filed under: Dietary supplements

Supplements may boost energy but strain troops' hearts

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Military doctors are worried that certain energy supplements could lead to heart problems in U.S. troops.

According to a recent  article in Stars and Stripes, Military doctors are worried that certain energy supplements could lead to heart problems in U.S. troops, particularly those serving in combat zones.

Click below to access the article.

Supplements may boost energy but strain troops' hearts

Tainted Products Marketed as Dietary Supplements

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The FDA announces a letter to all dietary supplement trade associations about the growing problem of misbranded drugs masquerading as dietary supplements.

The FDA held a press conference on 12/15/2010 announcing that it was sending a letter to all dietary supplement trade associations, as well as posting a message to consumers, about the growing problem related to the sale of various misbranded drug products masquerading as "dietary supplements."

Click on link to read the announcement.
Click here for the [PDF] file.

New study on glucosamine: High doses and prolonged use may lead to risk of developing diabetes

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The Montreal Gazette is reporting that a new study made public yesterday links glucosamine, a popular over-the-counter dietary supplement for joint problems with a risk of developing diabetes.

Glucosaminebottle_shutterstock.jpgPhoto: Shutterstock.com

The Montreal Gazette is reporting that a new study made public yesterday links glucosamine, a popular over-the-counter dietary supplement for joint problems with a risk of developing diabetes. The study, which was published in the Journal of Endocrinology,  looks at in-vitro cell lines from mice and rats.

The experiment showed that the supplement triggers a mechanism intended to lower high blood sugar levels, but it also destroyed about 50 per cent of the cells by affecting SIRT1, a protein crucial to cell survival.

Click on link to access the article.

Study links glucosamine to risk of developing diabetes

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Rethinking protein powder supplements

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Protein powder supplements are a popular source for packing on muscle.

Protein powder in a cup

Protein powder supplements are a popular source for packing on muscle. The September 27, 2010 edition Health section of the L.A. Times contains an article that poses the question of how much supplements, if any, should one use in building muscle mass?

Read the full article here.

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Confused about supplements?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Wandering down the aisle of a store looking for a dietary supplement can be overwhelming and intimidating. The Natural Medicines Database can help.

Wandering down the aisle of a store looking for a dietary supplement can be overwhelming and intimidating. There are so many to choose from, and we often have to make our choices based on advertising claims and rely on the manufacturers for ingredient information. Does the supplement actually have the ingredients claimed on the label? Will it have the reported effect on our health?

The Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database is the “scientific gold standard” for evidence-based information on dietary supplements and natural medicines, including drug interactions, effectiveness, safety and use, and more. HPRC has partnered with Natural Medicines Database to allow healthcare providers, Warfighters, and military families to search this comprehensive database in order to make informed decisions about dietary supplement use. The Natural Medicines Database also has “Natural MedWATCH,” which allows users to report an adverse event associated with the use of dietary supplements or natural medicines so that they can then forward the report on to the appropriate regulatory agency.

By going to the HPRC homepage, users can access any of the three database choices provided: Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database for Health Professionals, Consumers, or Natural MedWATCH. After choosing one of the sites, first-time users should sign up for an account, which is done with an active DoD email address. Once inside this vast database, a user can search for an individual natural medicine ingredient of interest or a brand name product.

The professional version of the database includes:

  • Evidence-based monographs available for individual natural ingredients.
  • Scientific names of ingredients
  • Information on safety, effectiveness, mechanism of action, adverse reactions, interactions, and dosage/administration (which are not necessarily recommended or safe doses) of ingredients
  • Patient handouts
  • Brand-name product searches by ingredient
  • “Natural Product Effectiveness Checker” for medical conditions
  • “Natural Product Drug Interaction Checker” for a list of drugs/natural products interactions
  • Comprehensive information on brand-name products, including ingredient lists and summary reports on effectiveness, interactions, and adverse effects.
  • Up-to-date information for over 60,000 brand name products

The consumer version, for military families and Warfighters, contains the same research-based information on herbal remedies, dietary supplements and other natural products, but in an easier-to-understand version. An important point consumers should be aware of is that it may be necessary to research each individual ingredient in a product before making a decision to use it for health benefits.

So, if you want to find credible, evidence-based information on dietary supplements and/or natural products, search the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. Evaluating natural health products can be daunting and there is no other comprehensive, reliable site like it to guide you in making your decision.

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Herbal supplements face new scrutiny

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There is a growing trend in the U.S. of consumers using a variety of dietary supplements in hopes of getting healthier, warding off disease and easing symptoms of various conditions. A recent Wall Street Journal article reports that the federal government is stepping up research into the safety and effectiveness of a wide range of products to help consumers make more informed choices about supplements.

There is a growing trend in the U.S. of consumers using a variety of dietary supplements in hopes of getting healthier, warding off disease and easing symptoms of various conditions.

In a September 14, 2010 article, The Wall Street Journal reports that the federal government is stepping up research into the safety and effectiveness of a wide range of products to help consumers make more informed choices about supplements. The article in full-text can be accessed here.

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Risky marketing: Dietary supplements and teen athletics

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The Columbus Dispatch (Ohio) recently ran a five-day series titled "Little leagues, big costs" In this series, The Dispatch explores where youth sports have taken wrong turns in recent years.

The Columbus Dispatch (Ohio) recently ran a five-day series titled "Little leagues, big costs" In this series, The Dispatch explores where youth sports have taken wrong turns in recent years.

The link below from that series contains an article that focuses on the dangers of how some unregulated dietary supplements are being targeted at teens

Supplements target teens, pose dangers and are virtually unregulated

 

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Study examines energy drinks claims on athletic performance

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Popular energy drinks promise superior athletic performance and weight loss but do the claims hold up?

Popular energy drinks promise superior athletic performance and weight loss but do the claims hold up? Not always, according to a study conducted by researchers from Nova Southeastern University.   According to the study, energy drinks may increase athletic performance and aerobic benefits. The researchers found conflicting evidence regarding the impact of energy drinks on weight loss, although some data suggest that combining energy drink use with exercise may enhance body fat reduction.

Read the article here.

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Consumer Reports® report finds dangerous dietary supplements

HPRC Fitness Arena:
In a report from the September 2010 issue of Consumer Reports®, the twelve most dangerous dietary supplements posing health risks have been identified.

In a report from the September 2010 issue of Consumer Reports®,   the twelve most dangerous dietary supplements posing health risks have been identified. According to the report, these are dietary supplements which are taken by millions of Americans and have been found to cause serious health problems, including cardiovascular, liver, and kidney problems.

Read the report here.

New report on protein drinks

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Consumer Reports says many protein drinks contain contaminants.

Recent surveys of dietary supplement use indicate that about 20 percent of active duty personnel are using some type of protein powder. The percentage of users is likely higher among special operations personnel, and this is of concern given the July 2010 Consumer Reports® Alert on protein drinks. These powder products are typically mixed with milk, water, or another liquid to make a shake and promoted as a sure way to increase muscle mass. The products often come in different flavors, with strawberry and chocolate the mainstays.

The Consumer Reports® Alert indicated that most of the 15 protein drink products analyzed contained miniscule to concerning amounts of selected contaminants – arsenic, cadmium, lead, and/or mercury – each of which is toxic to various organs in the body. Military personnel commonly use several of the products noted in the report. These include EAS Myoplex Original Rich Dark Chocolate Shakes; Muscle Milk chocolate, vanilla crème, and nutritional shake beverages; MuscleTech Nitro-Tech Hardcore Pro-Series Vanilla Milkshake; selected GNC products, and BSN and Optimum Nutrition whey protein products.

It is important to note that if three servings of these products were taken per day, consumers could be ingesting amounts of these contaminants in excess of the maximum limits proposed by the United States Pharmacopeia, the authoritative standard for health products. Importantly, toxic effects have been reported from using these products and are of concern because the Food and Drug Administration does not require such products to be tested to confirm the absence of contaminants and other potentially dangerous products before they are sold.

Take Home Message: A chicken breast, three 8-oz glasses of milk, and three eggs are inexpensive sources of high quality protein, whereas protein powders are expensive sources of uncertain quality, and potentially contaminated, protein. It is both better and cheaper to eat real foods.

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