You are here: Home / HPRC Blog

Filed under: Army

Performance Triad has grown!

HPRC Fitness Arena: Total Force Fitness
Sleep, activity, and nutrition are crucial for Total Force Fitness. Learn more about them through the Army’s Performance Triad.

The Performance Triad is an Army program that focuses on 3 key areas to enhance the health and performance of Soldiers and their families: sleep, activity, and nutrition. HPRC has featured articles about the Performance Triad since it was launched in 2013, but the program has been growing steadily. That means it’s time for a visit to explore the wealth of materials now available, including information and graphic products about:

  • personal health assessment
  • back-to-school tips
  • nutrition and oral health
  • fitness activities for families
  • pets
  • sleep, travel, and time zones
  • goal setting
  • advice for leaders
  • Army-specific resources

Whether you’ve been there before, or you’re just finding out, take time now to visit HPRC’s introduction to the Performance Triad to get started. Look for links on the Performance Triad home page to their Facebook and Twitter feeds too. Learn how these 3 performance areas can contribute to your total fitness.

Celebrate the Army National Guard!

HPRC Fitness Arena: Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Army, National Guard
On December 13, the National Guard will be celebrating its 378th birthday! That’s right—378 years since founding.

The Army National Guard actually counts 1636 as its founding year, which makes it significantly older than the United States itself. The Massachusetts Bay Colony formed three permanent militia regiments to provide organized defense of the colony; the date of the General Court order was December 13. These regiments still exist as the Massachusetts Army National Guard, now as four units: the 101st Engineer Battalion, the 101st Field Artillery Regiment, the 181st Infantry Regiment, and the 182nd Infantry Regiment.

As colonies developed along the eastern shores and then inland, they formed their individual militia and organized themselves along regimental lines. After the formation of the U.S., militia were organized by the individual states; for much of the 19th century, the U.S. had no national standing army. The name “National Guard” was originally adopted by the 2nd Battalion, 11th New York Artillery, during the War of 1812, in honor of the Marquis de Lafayette of the French National Guard. The name was officially adopted for all state militia with the Militia Act of 1903. In 1933, the state militia joined the National Guard of the United States, a reserve force of the U.S. Army.

So how is it that the Army National Guard can be older than the U.S. Army? Our founding fathers saw fit to recognize the contributions of the states’ militia when they passed the Militia Act of May 8, 1792, which enabled pre-existing militia units to retain their “customary privileges.” Subsequent acts of Congress have perpetuated this.

Militia units have participated in every U.S. military action since 1636, including the Revolutionary War, War of 1812, throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, and now into the 21st. National Guard units also participate in domestic peacekeeping activities and assist with the aftermath of natural disasters. So on December 13, take a moment to learn more about what our Army National Guard is up to by visiting the Guard News and Overseas Operations pages on the National Guard website.

Sub terra firma

Combat training is moving underground. New tactics—and, potentially, new doctrine—are being developed to help troops perform in underground environments where enemies could hide.

The U.S. Army’s Asymmetric Warfare Group has been training joint forces in some unusual places—underground venues such as tunnels, caves, and sewers. As battlefields become more urban and enemies move underground, subterranean environments pose unique operational challenges. Although the Army does not currently have an official field manual for underground combat, this new tactical training has developed units’ ability to perform in these environments. Combat training centers are starting to integrate these kinds of complex environments into their facilities, and the Army is urging home-station training to “get creative” and use simple techniques to simulate their own underground environments. Something as simple as training in a dark room with obstacles can simulate underground areas. Israeli Defense Forces have also had success with this type of training. Being able to adapt and perform in challenging environments is a vital part of warrior resilience.

Tracking down snipers with smartphones

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
New smartphone technology may help Warfighters in combat track down snipers.

If you’re in the military, your smartphone may have just gotten smarter. Researchers have recently developed hardware and software that enables teams with Android smartphones to locate nearby snipers. Acoustic sensors have been developed and used by the military in the past, but this portable attachment hooks up to a smartphone and uses microphone sensors to triangulate a sniper’s location through muzzle blasts and shockwaves. Other sniper sensors have been developed, such as the helmet-mounted sensor back in 2007 that is the predecessor to this smartphone system. According to one source, the Army has plans to send soldiers to Afghanistan with smartphone technology that will allow them to communicate—even text—more effectively out in the field. As smartphones find their way into combat, this kind of technology shows great promise for the near future.

Strong enough for a Warfighter, and made for a woman

HPRC Fitness Arena: Environment, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Armor, Army, Combat, Women
Testing of new female body armor is taking place this summer. Changes to the design will decrease the total weight a female Warfighter carries.

Although a limited amount of new-generation body armor specifically designed for women is already in theater, field tests will take place in July and August on 600 sets of this armor for female soldiers. These tests are part of the Army’s Rapid Fielding Initiative in which they roll out cutting-edge equipment for soldiers. This important development is just one change that is needed if women are to enter additional military occupational specialties, including front-line roles in ground combat. (The ban on women in combat was lifted in January of 2013.)

A noted feature of the new body armor is the decrease in weight from 31 to 25 pounds, which can reduce pressure on muscles and bones, possibly reducing musculoskeletal injuries. In addition, because there’s less friction and chaffing, the body armor is more comfortable. Even more important, though, the new armor addresses complaints from women that poor-fitting body armor restricts movement needed to carry out operations such as raising and firing a rifle.

Check out this PowerPoint for additional information on the Improved Outer Tactical Vest (IOTV), including improvements and capabilities.

May 1 Priority Registration for Army 10-Miler

Filed under: Army
Be one of 35,000 runners at the 29th annual Army 10-miler this October. Race fees and sponsor contributions support the Army Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) programs.

Both service members and civilians with at least seven Army 10-miler finishes under their belt are eligible for one of the 10,000 bibs available via early registration starting May 1st just after midnight for the 29th annual Army 10-Miler on Sunday, October 20, 2013. Service members must register with their .mil email addresses. Regular registration opens on May 15. Visit the Army 10-miler website for more information.

RSS Feed