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Alerts

FDA advises consumers to stop using any supplement products labeled as OxyElite Pro or VERSA-1. Please see the following advisories: FDA -10/08/13, FDA - 10/11/13 and CDC - 10/08/13.

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Announcements

New article on reporting side effects of supplements
Just published in The New England Journal of Medicine: A recent article brings up dietary supplement issues you need to be aware of and discusses how dietary supplement side effects could be monitored better. A PDF of the April 3rd article is available free online.

3rd International Congress on Soldiers’ Physical Performance
August 18-21, 2014
The ICSPP delivers innovative scientific programming on soldiers’ physical performance with experts from around the world.

DMAA list updated for April 2014

Fueling Performance Photo Campaign
Share photos of how you fuel your performance and be featured on our Facebook page!

Dietary supplement module
Earn continuing education credits (if eligible) for this two-hour online module.

Operation LiveWell

Performance Triad

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HPRC Blog

Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

Understand cholesterol-related food claims

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Filed under: Nutrition, Diet
Be an educated consumer and learn what common cholesterol-related nutrient content claims mean.

Do you find the nutrient claims listed on many foods confusing?  You are not alone!

Such claims are strictly defined by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Here are common cholesterol-related nutrient content claims with a detailed description of what each means. If a food claims to be cholesterol free, it means that one serving of the product contains less than two milligrams of cholesterol and two grams or less of saturated fat. Low cholesterol means that one serving contains 20 or fewer milligrams of cholesterol and two grams or less of saturated fat. Finally, reduced cholesterol means at least 25 percent less cholesterol than the regular product and 2 grams or less of saturated fat. Arm yourself with this information and be an educated consumer next time you shop.

Men and women sweat differently

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The New York Times Well blog features an article on research that studies the differences of men and women sweat.

Sweating WomanPhoto: Shutterstock.com

The New York Times Well blog features an article on research that studies the differences of men and women sweat.

According to the article, fit women seem to sweat differently than unfit people of either sex, and quite differently than fit men, a fact that has implications for sports performance.

Click on the link below to access the article.

Do Women Sweat Differently Than Men?

 

Preventing sports related injuries

HPRC Fitness Arena:
The October 20 edition of the Vancouver Sun has a brief article on preventing sports injuries.

Woman with knee painPhoto:Shutterstock.com

The October 20 edition of the Vancouver Sun has a brief article on preventing sports injuries.

Click on link below to access the article.

Eat a PBJ post-workout

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Want a great post-workout meal?

It’s important to eat something after a strenuous workout to replenish muscle stores of carbohydrate and have plenty of protein available to repair the body. Try a peanut butter and jelly (PBJ) sandwich for a great post workout meal! It’s cheap and packed with nutrition if you use natural peanut butter without added sugar and fats, and whole-grain bread.

For other post-exercise snacks please visit the Warfighter Nutrition Guide.

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Treadmills vs. elliptical machines – which is better?

HPRC Fitness Arena:
A look at two gym favorites.

Treadmill Elliptical Machines

Reuters.com has an article that examines the advantages and disadvantages of treadmills versus elliptical exercise machines.

Read the full article here.

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Follow-up article questions the validity of military's blood test screening for concussions/TBI

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Wired Magazine questions the Army's research on concussions and traumatic brain injuries.

Doctor Analyzing X-Ray

In the 10/18 In the Crosshairs, we linked to a story on  from CNN.com that reported on military medical researchers that have developed a blood test that can detect if someone has suffered a concussion or a mild traumatic brain injury.

In response, Wired.com has an article in their  Danger Room section that calls into question the research that has been done by the Army.

Read the full article here.

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Military medical researchers develop blood for screening concussions or mild traumatic brain injury

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Can a blood test detect a concussion or TBI?

MRI of Head

CNN.com is reporting that military medical researchers have developed a blood test that can detect if someone has suffered a concussion or a mild traumatic brain injury.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a big concern for the military, particularly milder forms, because unlike TBI, milder injuries cannot be seen on X-rays, CT scans or MRIs. Having this test would be useful not only for the military but for civilians as well.

Read the full article here.

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Stand more often to become leaner

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Are you sitting down?

Rather than sitting during the day, stand when possible. During your next phone conversation, stand up. Standing burns more calories by engaging more muscles and prevents inactivation of fat burning enzymes. It uses more blood glucose which may prevent adult onset diabetes. According to this article, simply standing can improve your cholesterol and overall health – an amazingly simple strategy to improve fitness!

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Overweight recruits make it tough to fill military ranks

HPRC Fitness Arena:
There have been a rash of articles in the news recently focusing on soldier fitness (or lack thereof).

KENS Channel 5 in San Antonio, TX has posted an article on their website that reports that, according to the military, the number of prospective recruits are just too fat to enlist, which is making it difficult to fill their ranks.

The article cites a non-profit group called Mission Readiness, made up of retired senior military leaders, who feel there is a solution to the problem.

The group has a three-point approach that would solve the obesity problem for prospective recruits:

  1. Get the junk food and high-calorie beverages out of our schools.
  2. Increase funding for the school lunch program.
  3. Support the development, testing and deployment of proven public-health interventions.

Read the full article here.

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Have your children drink more water for good health

HPRC Fitness Arena:
Your child may not be drinking enough water to stay healthy.

Dietary data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES, 2005-2006) for children between ages two through 19 suggest that children may not be drinking enough water for optimal health. The study also found that children and adolescents may be getting as much as two-thirds of their total water intake with their main meals. Try replacing non-nutritious beverages like sodas with nutritious beverages (or better yet, plain water) at meal time. This  could have a positive impact on the diet, weight, and health of your children.

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