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Welcome to the HPRC Blog. We've got lots of information here, from quick tips to in-depth posts about detailed human performance optimization topics.

FAQs about relationships

Have questions about relationships? Visit the new FAQs section in HPRC’s Family & Relationships domain to find answers.

Visit the newest section of HPRC’s website—“Frequently Asked Questions About Relationships.” It includes strategies for communicating and managing conflict, building and maintaining strong relationships, and fostering parent-child relationships.

Here are some kinds of questions you can find answers to:

  • Is there such a thing as a healthy argument?
  • How can I be a better listener?
  • Why do I get so angry that I can’t think clearly?
  • Can I win more arguments than I lose and still have a good relationship?
  • How can I change my attitude and focus less on the negative?
  • How can I help my children get through challenging situations?

You can use these strategies in all your relationships—friends, coworkers, bosses, leaders, etc.—not just your intimate and family relationships.

You can find more questions and answers in “Frequently Asked Questions About Relationships.”

Stressed out? It isn’t all in your head.

HPRC Fitness Arena: Mind Tactics, Total Force Fitness
The mind-body connection is incredibly powerful. Learn more about how this two-way interaction can work for and against you.

Stress affects your body, and the condition of your body can cause stress. If you have PTSD, you could be so chronically stressed that it contributes to a heart condition. Or if you had a heart attack, you could feel so traumatized that you become anxious. What’s more, stress could have contributed to your heart attack in the first place. This back-and-forth relationship also occurs between physical pain and depression. You physically hurt, so you feel down…you feel down, and so you hurt more.

This link between mind and body is amazing. Sometimes it can feel like it’s working against us, but you can also use the mind-body connection to your advantage! For instance, you can learn to push through strong emotions with mindfulness, reduce your blood pressure with a self-driven technique called autogenic training, or turn on your body’s relaxation response through deep breathing.

There are lots more ways you can put the mind-body connection to work to reduce your stress. Get more ideas by exploring HPRC’s Mind-Body Skills section.

High-intensity exercise for your teen

April is the “Month of the Military Child.” Learn how to help your child stay fit for a healthier tomorrow.

High-intensity exercise is no longer a new fitness fad, and your children can benefit from this type of exercise too. It’s established as the most efficient way to improve overall fitness. And with this month’s focus on military children’s health, now is the time to teach yours good habits for the future.

This doesn’t mean that you need to take your children to a trainer for high-intensity interval training. What it does mean is that they should be getting the type of exercise or play that makes them breathe hard and gets their heart thumping. Both traditional and high-intensity exercise improve fitness in children and teens. This can be useful if you find your children getting bored doing the same kind of exercise or play all the time.

Remember when encouraging your child or teen to be active to let them find the kinds of activities and play that are most enjoyable for them. If your child is a competitive athlete and/or being trained by a professional, keep an eye out for symptoms of overuse, overtraining, and other injuries. Developing kids can experience the same kinds of injuries as adults. Help your child stay fit and healthy, and keep your family ready and resilient. 

Can you spice up your weight loss?

Capsaicin gives certain foods their spiciness. It’s also being sold as a dietary supplement. But will it help you lose weight? Read more in the latest OPSS FAQ.

If you’ve ever eaten something spicy and felt a burning sensation on your tongue, then you’ve eaten capsaicin. Capsaicin is the substance found in chili peppers such as jalapeños, serranos, and habaneros that gives them their spiciness. Although humans have been eating peppers for thousands of years, capsaicin has only recently come into the supplement spotlight. As an isolated ingredient, it is usually sold as capsules labeled “cayenne pepper” or “capsicum” after the family of peppers that naturally contain capsaicin.

Capsaicin supplements are marketed to aid with weight loss in three ways: increase energy use, burn fat, and decrease appetite. Some scientific evidence supports these statements, but the results of most studies were inconsistent, short-lived, and didn’t always result in weight loss. Long-term effects of taking capsaicin supplements, especially at high doses, are still unknown, so their safety over time needs further investigation.

Although capsaicin is considered safe to consume in food, capsaicin supplements can cause gastrointestinal issues (gas, stomach pain, and diarrhea) for some people. They also can interact with certain medications and other herbal supplements, so you should consult a healthcare provider before taking it. Capsaicin supplements also may not be safe if you are allergic to peppers or if you‘re pregnant or lactating.

Visit Operation Supplement Safety for more OPSS FAQs about weight loss.

The power of purple produce

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Purple fruits and vegetables make up only a tiny portion of most Americans’ diets, but they can play a huge part in your health.

Most Americans don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables, especially purple fruits and vegetables. But give these foods a second thought: Eating purple fruits and vegetables could improve your diet, lower your blood pressure, and give you a smaller waist.

Purple fruits and vegetables great sources of vitamins, minerals, and fiber, and many are also high in plant compounds such as anthocyanins, which give these foods their purplish colors. Anthocyanins have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and help protect against heart disease, cancer, and age-related memory loss.

Power your performance with foods high in anthocyanins such as açai berries, blackberries, blueberries, cranberries, black raspberries, red cabbage, red and purple grapes, eggplant, and red onions. Try making a parfait with your favorite berries, low-fat Greek yogurt, and granola for a sweet treat. If you’re craving something more savory, how about an eggplant parmesan for dinner? (Bonus: You’ll get another antioxidant—lycopene—from the tomato sauce!)

National Veterans Wheelchair Games

April 15th is the registration deadline for the National Veterans Wheelchair games. The event is open to veterans who need a wheelchair to participate in sporting events.

April 15th brings to mind the dreaded tax deadline. But it’s also the registration deadline for a much more enjoyable event: The 35th National Veterans Wheelchair Games. The games will be held in Dallas, Texas, June 21–26, 2015. Participation in the games is open to veterans who require a wheelchair for athletic competition due to spinal cord injuries, amputations, multiple sclerosis, or other neurologic conditions. Events include air pistols, air rifle, archery, basketball, bowling, hand cycling, motor rally, power soccer, quad rugby, and more! To register and get more information, go to wheelchairgames.org/registration/. And for those of you not competing, consider volunteering. See the website’s volunteer page to learn how.

Think pink for lycopene

HPRC Fitness Arena: Nutrition, Total Force Fitness
Filed under: Diet, Nutrition
Lycopene gives color to food and provides health benefits to your body. You’ll be surprised at how at how many ways you can get lycopene in your meals and snacks.

Lycopene is a chemical that gives some fruits and vegetables their red, pink, and orange hues. Most of the lycopene that people eat comes from ripe tomatoes and tomato products, but other foods high in lycopene include watermelon, red- or pink-fleshed guava, red-fleshed papaya, pink grapefruit, and apricots. These foods are also great sources of vitamins A and C, folate, potassium, and fiber. In addition to being nutritious, foods high in lycopene have been linked to lower risk of cancer (specifically, prostate) and heart disease thanks to lycopene’s antioxidative properties.

If eating a whole, raw tomato doesn’t seem appetizing, don’t fret. There are countless ways to add lycopene-rich foods into your eating plan. You actually get more lycopene from cooked and canned tomatoes and tomato products because cooking makes lycopene easier for your body to absorb. Make a pesto with sun-dried tomatoes or add them to a sandwich for a tangy touch. Instead of stuffed peppers, try stuffed tomatoes; or make a simple pasta dish with marinara sauce. Eat half a grapefruit with your breakfast or use it to top a salad at lunch (but check for interactions if you’re taking any drugs). For dessert, blend some frozen papaya and watermelon to make your own sorbet or smoothie.

For more information on lycopene, visit the American Cancer Society.

Apps and more for military kids

Learn about some great apps for military kids to manage stress and the military lifestyle well.

Most military children will at some point experience stress related to being part of a military family. Fortunately, there are numerous online resources to help military kids and their parents learn important coping skills, especially for when a parent returns from a deployment. A parent can load apps such as the following on their phone and then hand it to their child:

  • Breathe, Think, Do with Sesame (for Apple and Android) teaches children coping skills through breathing and more,
  • The Big Moving Adventure (for Apple and Android) teaches children about moving (how to pack up their toys, say goodbye to friends, etc.).
  • Focus on the Go (for Apple and Android) teaches children how to manage their feelings in helpful ways.

Military Kids Connect (MKC) is a Department of Defense program aimed at improving quality of life for military children of various ages. The site helps parents, caregivers, children, and the child’s peer community to talk about issues and learn coping skills through a variety of apps (Apple, Android, and Kindle) and online tools.

HPRC’s Family Resilience “Tools, Apps, & Videos” section includes links to more programs (such as FOCUS World and Sesame Street) and apps. But don’t forget: As with any online activities, monitor your children and be vigilant against cyber threats.

Listen to your heart

With special equipment, you can manage your emotional stress as well as the timing and intensity of your physical training.

As your heart beats, the amount of time between these beats varies. In other words, your heart rate is constantly changing—speeding up and slowing down. Though it might seem counterintuitive, more of this “heart rate variability” (HRV) is better for both your physical health and how you cope with stress. And you can learn to listen and use it.

Some heart-rate monitors allow you to monitor your HRV and the effects of different training routines on it. Or you can check out biofeedback to help you master stress-management techniques such as paced breathing by giving you immediate feedback about your heart rate. Either way, HRV is a tool that can help you find the optimal timing for recovery or lighter training within your long-term workout regimen. In fact, HRV can even show when you’re at greatest risk for injury.

Pushing yourself is an important part of performance optimization, but you also need to regulate your emotional and physical stress. Biofeedback can help with your emotions, and heart-rate monitors that measure HRV can help optimize your physical training over months and years. Visit “Vary Your Heart Rate to Perform Your Best” to learn more about how you can use HRV.

Hemp products: Are they allowed?

Find out if service members are allowed to consume products made with some form of hemp.

Hemp, or Cannabis sativa, is the plant that naturally contains the substance tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana) although the chemical can also be produced in a laboratory. Historically, the hemp plant has been used for fiber in clothing, rope, paper, etc., as well as for nutritional, medicinal, and recreational purposes.

According to a 2015 report on hemp prepared for Congress, different varieties (and parts) of the cannabis plant are grown and used for different purposes. “Industrial hemp”—the kind grown for agricultural crops (including in foods, beverages, and dietary supplements)—is typically less than 1% THC. Cannabis grown to produce marijuana usually contains around 10% (but can exceed 30%) THC in the parts of the plant used.

DoD policy as set in DoDI 1010.01 specifically mentions marijuana, “synthetic cannabinoids,” and controlled substances (which include THC), but does not mention hemp per se, and test levels for THC are described in DoDI 1010.16. However, each military service has its own policy on the use of hemp products:

  • Air Force: AFI 90-507, section 1.1.6, states that “the ingestion of products containing or products derived from hemp seed or hemp seed oil is prohibited.”
  • Army: Army Substance Abuse Program, AR600-85, section 4-2p states “this regulation prohibits Soldiers from using Hemp or products containing Hemp oil.”
  • Navy: OPNAVINST 5350.4d, Drug Testing Program, Enclosure (2), states that the “Navy has ‘zero tolerance’ for...the wrongful use, possession, manufacture, or distribution of a controlled substance,” which includes marijuana and THC. The Navy does not have a formal policy on the use of hemp products in food.
  • Coast Guard: ALCOAST 026/99 and COMDTINST M1000.10, section 3.A, state that “ingestion of hemp oil or products made with hemp oil is misconduct that will not be tolerated in the Coast Guard.”

Currently, hemp seeds are being added to a variety of foods (such as yogurt, energy bars, etc.), and based on service policies, such products are prohibited.

For more answers to common questions we’ve received about dietary supplements, please visit our Operation Supplement Safety (OPSS) FAQs.

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